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What is Worth Saving?





#hackadaycolumns #rants #science #space #arecibo #areciboobservatory #newsletter #rant #repairorreplace #hackaday
posted by pod_feeder_v2
What is Worth Saving?
 

What is Worth Saving?





#hackadaycolumns #rants #science #space #arecibo #areciboobservatory #newsletter #rant #repairorreplace #hackaday
posted by pod_feeder_v2
What is Worth Saving?
 
#politics #science #antropology #work #rant #bullshit-jobs

In memory of David Graeber (RIP)

On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs: A Work Rant (by David Graeber)


In the year 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by century's end, technology would have advanced sufficiently that countries like Great Britain or the United States would have achieved a 15-hour work week. There's every reason to believe he was right. In technological terms, we are quite capable of this. And yet it didn't happen. Instead, technology has been marshaled, if anything, to figure out ways to make us all work more. In order to achieve this, jobs have had to be created that are, effectively, pointless. Huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed. The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it.

Why did Keynes' promised utopia—still being eagerly awaited in the '60s—never materialise? The standard line today is that he didn't figure in the massive increase in consumerism. Given the choice between less hours and more toys and pleasures, we've collectively chosen the latter. This presents a nice morality tale, but even a moment's reflection shows it can't really be true. Yes, we have witnessed the creation of an endless variety of new jobs and industries since the '20s, but very few have anything to do with the production and distribution of sushi, iPhones, or fancy sneakers.

So what are these new jobs, precisely? A recent report comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 gives us a clear picture (and I note, one pretty much exactly echoed in the UK). Over the course of the last century, the number of workers employed as domestic servants, in industry, and in the farm sector has collapsed dramatically. At the same time, ‘professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers’ tripled, growing ‘from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment.’ In other words, productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away (even if you count industrial workers globally, including the toiling masses in India and China, such workers are still not nearly so large a percentage of the world population as they used to be.)

But rather than allowing a massive reduction of working hours to free the world's population to pursue their own projects, pleasures, visions, and ideas, we have seen the ballooning of not even so much of the ‘service’ sector as of the administrative sector, up to and including the creation of whole new industries like financial services or telemarketing, or the unprecedented expansion of sectors like corporate law, academic and health administration, human resources, and public relations. And these numbers do not even reflect on all those people whose job is to provide administrative, technical, or security support for these industries, or for that matter the whole host of ancillary industries (dog-washers, all-night pizza delivery) that only exist because everyone else is spending so much of their time working in all the other ones.

These are what I propose to call ‘bullshit jobs’.

It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs just for the sake of keeping us all working. And here, precisely, lies the mystery. In capitalism, this is precisely what is not supposed to happen. Sure, in the old inefficient socialist states like the Soviet Union, where employment was considered both a right and a sacred duty, the system made up as many jobs as they had to (this is why in Soviet department stores it took three clerks to sell a piece of meat). But, of course, this is the sort of very problem market competition is supposed to fix. According to economic theory, at least, the last thing a profit-seeking firm is going to do is shell out money to workers they don't really need to employ. Still, somehow, it happens.

While corporations may engage in ruthless downsizing, the layoffs and speed-ups invariably fall on that class of people who are actually making, moving, fixing and maintaining things; through some strange alchemy no one can quite explain, the number of salaried paper-pushers ultimately seems to expand, and more and more employees find themselves, not unlike Soviet workers actually, working 40 or even 50 hour weeks on paper, but effectively working 15 hours just as Keynes predicted, since the rest of their time is spent organizing or attending motivational seminars, updating their facebook profiles or downloading TV box-sets.

The answer clearly isn't economic: it's moral and political. The ruling class has figured out that a happy and productive population with free time on their hands is a mortal danger (think of what started to happen when this even began to be approximated in the '60s). And, on the other hand, the feeling that work is a moral value in itself, and that anyone not willing to submit themselves to some kind of intense work discipline for most of their waking hours deserves nothing, is extraordinarily convenient for them.

Once, when contemplating the apparently endless growth of administrative responsibilities in British academic departments, I came up with one possible vision of hell. Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don't like and are not especially good at. Say they were hired because they were excellent cabinet-makers, and then discover they are expected to spend a great deal of their time frying fish. Neither does the task really need to be done—at least, there's only a very limited number of fish that need to be fried. Yet somehow, they all become so obsessed with resentment at the thought that some of their co-workers might be spending more time making cabinets, and not doing their fair share of the fish-frying responsibilities, that before long there's endless piles of useless badly cooked fish piling up all over the workshop and it's all that anyone really does. I think this is actually a pretty accurate description of the moral dynamics of our own economy.

Now, I realise any such argument is going to run into immediate objections: ‘who are you to say what jobs are really “necessary”? What's necessary anyway? You're an anthropology professor, what's the “need” for that?’ (And indeed a lot of tabloid readers would take the existence of my job as the very definition of wasteful social expenditure.) And on one level, this is obviously true. There can be no objective measure of social value.

I would not presume to tell someone who is convinced they are making a meaningful contribution to the world that, really, they are not. But what about those people who are themselves convinced their jobs are meaningless? Not long ago I got back in touch with a school friend who I hadn't seen since I was 12. I was amazed to discover that in the interim, he had become first a poet, then the front man in an indie rock band. I'd heard some of his songs on the radio having no idea the singer was someone I actually knew. He was obviously brilliant, innovative, and his work had unquestionably brightened and improved the lives of people all over the world. Yet, after a couple of unsuccessful albums, he'd lost his contract, and plagued with debts and a newborn daughter, ended up, as he put it, ‘taking the default choice of so many directionless folk: law school.’ Now he's a corporate lawyer working in a prominent New York firm. He was the first to admit that his job was utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist.

There's a lot of questions one could ask here, starting with, what does it say about our society that it seems to generate an extremely limited demand for talented poet-musicians, but an apparently infinite demand for specialists in corporate law? (Answer: if 1% of the population controls most of the disposable wealth, what we call ‘the market’ reflects what they think is useful or important, not anybody else.) But even more, it shows that most people in these jobs are ultimately aware of it. In fact, I'm not sure I've ever met a corporate lawyer who didn't think their job was bullshit. The same goes for almost all the new industries outlined above. There is a whole class of salaried professionals that, should you meet them at parties and admit that you do something that might be considered interesting (an anthropologist, for example), will want to avoid even discussing their line of work entirely (one or t'other?) Give them a few drinks, and they will launch into tirades about how pointless and stupid their job really is.

In the year 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by century's end, technology would have advanced sufficiently that countries like Great Britain or the United States would have achieved a 15-hour work week. There's every reason to believe he was right. In technological terms, we are quite capable of this. And yet it didn't happen. Instead, technology has been marshaled, if anything, to figure out ways to make us all work more. In order to achieve this, jobs have had to be created that are, effectively, pointless. Huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed. The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it.

Why did Keynes' promised utopia—still being eagerly awaited in the '60s—never materialise? The standard line today is that he didn't figure in the massive increase in consumerism. Given the choice between less hours and more toys and pleasures, we've collectively chosen the latter. This presents a nice morality tale, but even a moment's reflection shows it can't really be true. Yes, we have witnessed the creation of an endless variety of new jobs and industries since the '20s, but very few have anything to do with the production and distribution of sushi, iPhones, or fancy sneakers.

So what are these new jobs, precisely? A recent report comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 gives us a clear picture (and I note, one pretty much exactly echoed in the UK). Over the course of the last century, the number of workers employed as domestic servants, in industry, and in the farm sector has collapsed dramatically. At the same time, ‘professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers’ tripled, growing ‘from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment.’ In other words, productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away (even if you count industrial workers globally, including the toiling masses in India and China, such workers are still not nearly so large a percentage of the world population as they used to be.)

But rather than allowing a massive reduction of working hours to free the world's population to pursue their own projects, pleasures, visions, and ideas, we have seen the ballooning of not even so much of the ‘service’ sector as of the administrative sector, up to and including the creation of whole new industries like financial services or telemarketing, or the unprecedented expansion of sectors like corporate law, academic and health administration, human resources, and public relations. And these numbers do not even reflect on all those people whose job is to provide administrative, technical, or security support for these industries, or for that matter the whole host of ancillary industries (dog-washers, all-night pizza delivery) that only exist because everyone else is spending so much of their time working in all the other ones.

These are what I propose to call ‘bullshit jobs’.

It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs just for the sake of keeping us all working. And here, precisely, lies the mystery. In capitalism, this is precisely what is not supposed to happen. Sure, in the old inefficient socialist states like the Soviet Union, where employment was considered both a right and a sacred duty, the system made up as many jobs as they had to (this is why in Soviet department stores it took three clerks to sell a piece of meat). But, of course, this is the sort of very problem market competition is supposed to fix. According to economic theory, at least, the last thing a profit-seeking firm is going to do is shell out money to workers they don't really need to employ. Still, somehow, it happens.

While corporations may engage in ruthless downsizing, the layoffs and speed-ups invariably fall on that class of people who are actually making, moving, fixing and maintaining things; through some strange alchemy no one can quite explain, the number of salaried paper-pushers ultimately seems to expand, and more and more employees find themselves, not unlike Soviet workers actually, working 40 or even 50 hour weeks on paper, but effectively working 15 hours just as Keynes predicted, since the rest of their time is spent organizing or attending motivational seminars, updating their facebook profiles or downloading TV box-sets.

The answer clearly isn't economic: it's moral and political. The ruling class has figured out that a happy and productive population with free time on their hands is a mortal danger (think of what started to happen when this even began to be approximated in the '60s). And, on the other hand, the feeling that work is a moral value in itself, and that anyone not willing to submit themselves to some kind of intense work discipline for most of their waking hours deserves nothing, is extraordinarily convenient for them.

Once, when contemplating the apparently endless growth of administrative responsibilities in British academic departments, I came up with one possible vision of hell. Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don't like and are not especially good at. Say they were hired because they were excellent cabinet-makers, and then discover they are expected to spend a great deal of their time frying fish. Neither does the task really need to be done—at least, there's only a very limited number of fish that need to be fried. Yet somehow, they all become so obsessed with resentment at the thought that some of their co-workers might be spending more time making cabinets, and not doing their fair share of the fish-frying responsibilities, that before long there's endless piles of useless badly cooked fish piling up all over the workshop and it's all that anyone really does. I think this is actually a pretty accurate description of the moral dynamics of our own economy.

Now, I realise any such argument is going to run into immediate objections: ‘who are you to say what jobs are really “necessary”? What's necessary anyway? You're an anthropology professor, what's the “need” for that?’ (And indeed a lot of tabloid readers would take the existence of my job as the very definition of wasteful social expenditure.) And on one level, this is obviously true. There can be no objective measure of social value.

I would not presume to tell someone who is convinced they are making a meaningful contribution to the world that, really, they are not. But what about those people who are themselves convinced their jobs are meaningless? Not long ago I got back in touch with a school friend who I hadn't seen since I was 12. I was amazed to discover that in the interim, he had become first a poet, then the front man in an indie rock band. I'd heard some of his songs on the radio having no idea the singer was someone I actually knew. He was obviously brilliant, innovative, and his work had unquestionably brightened and improved the lives of people all over the world. Yet, after a couple of unsuccessful albums, he'd lost his contract, and plagued with debts and a newborn daughter, ended up, as he put it, ‘taking the default choice of so many directionless folk: law school.’ Now he's a corporate lawyer working in a prominent New York firm. He was the first to admit that his job was utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist.

There's a lot of questions one could ask here, starting with, what does it say about our society that it seems to generate an extremely limited demand for talented poet-musicians, but an apparently infinite demand for specialists in corporate law? (Answer: if 1% of the population controls most of the disposable wealth, what we call ‘the market’ reflects what they think is useful or important, not anybody else.) But even more, it shows that most people in these jobs are ultimately aware of it. In fact, I'm not sure I've ever met a corporate lawyer who didn't think their job was bullshit. The same goes for almost all the new industries outlined above. There is a whole class of salaried professionals that, should you meet them at parties and admit that you do something that might be considered interesting (an anthropologist, for example), will want to avoid even discussing their line of work entirely (one or t'other?) Give them a few drinks, and they will launch into tirades about how pointless and stupid their job really is.

This is a profound psychological violence here. How can one even begin to speak of dignity in labour when one secretly feels one's job should not exist? How can it not create a sense of deep rage and resentment. Yet it is the peculiar genius of our society that its rulers have figured out a way, as in the case of the fish-fryers, to ensure that rage is directed precisely against those who actually do get to do meaningful work. For instance: in our society, there seems a general rule that, the more obviously one's work benefits other people, the less one is likely to be paid for it. Again, an objective measure is hard to find, but one easy way to get a sense is to ask: what would happen were this entire class of people to simply disappear? Say what you like about nurses, garbage collectors, or mechanics, it's obvious that were they to vanish in a puff of smoke, the results would be immediate and catastrophic. A world without teachers or dock-workers would soon be in trouble, and even one without science fiction writers or ska musicians would clearly be a lesser place. It's not entirely clear how humanity would suffer were all private equity CEOs, lobbyists, PR researchers, actuaries, telemarketers, bailiffs or legal consultants to similarly vanish. (Many suspect it might markedly improve.) Yet apart from a handful of well-touted exceptions (doctors), the rule holds surprisingly well.

Even more perverse, there seems to be a broad sense that this is the way things should be. This is one of the secret strengths of right-wing populism. You can see it when tabloids whip up resentment against tube workers for paralysing London during contract disputes: the very fact that tube workers can paralyse London shows that their work is actually necessary, but this seems to be precisely what annoys people. It's even clearer in the US, where Republicans have had remarkable success mobilizing resentment against school teachers, or auto workers (and not, significantly, against the school administrators or auto industry managers who actually cause the problems) for their supposedly bloated wages and benefits. It's as if they are being told ‘but you get to teach children! Or make cars! You get to have real jobs! And on top of that you have the nerve to also expect middle-class pensions and health care?’

If someone had designed a work regime perfectly suited to maintaining the power of finance capital, it's hard to see how they could have done a better job. Real, productive workers are relentlessly squeezed and exploited. The remainder are divided between a terrorised stratum of the, universally reviled, unemployed and a larger stratum who are basically paid to do nothing, in positions designed to make them identify with the perspectives and sensibilities of the ruling class (managers, administrators, etc.)—and particularly its financial avatars—but, at the same time, foster a simmering resentment against anyone whose work has clear and undeniable social value. Clearly, the system was never consciously designed. It emerged from almost a century of trial and error. But it is the only explanation for why, despite our technological capacities, we are not all working 3–4 hour days.
 
#politics #science #antropology #work #rant #bullshit-jobs

In memory of David Graeber (RIP)

On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs: A Work Rant (by David Graeber)


In the year 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by century's end, technology would have advanced sufficiently that countries like Great Britain or the United States would have achieved a 15-hour work week. There's every reason to believe he was right. In technological terms, we are quite capable of this. And yet it didn't happen. Instead, technology has been marshaled, if anything, to figure out ways to make us all work more. In order to achieve this, jobs have had to be created that are, effectively, pointless. Huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed. The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it.

Why did Keynes' promised utopia—still being eagerly awaited in the '60s—never materialise? The standard line today is that he didn't figure in the massive increase in consumerism. Given the choice between less hours and more toys and pleasures, we've collectively chosen the latter. This presents a nice morality tale, but even a moment's reflection shows it can't really be true. Yes, we have witnessed the creation of an endless variety of new jobs and industries since the '20s, but very few have anything to do with the production and distribution of sushi, iPhones, or fancy sneakers.

So what are these new jobs, precisely? A recent report comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 gives us a clear picture (and I note, one pretty much exactly echoed in the UK). Over the course of the last century, the number of workers employed as domestic servants, in industry, and in the farm sector has collapsed dramatically. At the same time, ‘professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers’ tripled, growing ‘from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment.’ In other words, productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away (even if you count industrial workers globally, including the toiling masses in India and China, such workers are still not nearly so large a percentage of the world population as they used to be.)

But rather than allowing a massive reduction of working hours to free the world's population to pursue their own projects, pleasures, visions, and ideas, we have seen the ballooning of not even so much of the ‘service’ sector as of the administrative sector, up to and including the creation of whole new industries like financial services or telemarketing, or the unprecedented expansion of sectors like corporate law, academic and health administration, human resources, and public relations. And these numbers do not even reflect on all those people whose job is to provide administrative, technical, or security support for these industries, or for that matter the whole host of ancillary industries (dog-washers, all-night pizza delivery) that only exist because everyone else is spending so much of their time working in all the other ones.

These are what I propose to call ‘bullshit jobs’.

It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs just for the sake of keeping us all working. And here, precisely, lies the mystery. In capitalism, this is precisely what is not supposed to happen. Sure, in the old inefficient socialist states like the Soviet Union, where employment was considered both a right and a sacred duty, the system made up as many jobs as they had to (this is why in Soviet department stores it took three clerks to sell a piece of meat). But, of course, this is the sort of very problem market competition is supposed to fix. According to economic theory, at least, the last thing a profit-seeking firm is going to do is shell out money to workers they don't really need to employ. Still, somehow, it happens.

While corporations may engage in ruthless downsizing, the layoffs and speed-ups invariably fall on that class of people who are actually making, moving, fixing and maintaining things; through some strange alchemy no one can quite explain, the number of salaried paper-pushers ultimately seems to expand, and more and more employees find themselves, not unlike Soviet workers actually, working 40 or even 50 hour weeks on paper, but effectively working 15 hours just as Keynes predicted, since the rest of their time is spent organizing or attending motivational seminars, updating their facebook profiles or downloading TV box-sets.

The answer clearly isn't economic: it's moral and political. The ruling class has figured out that a happy and productive population with free time on their hands is a mortal danger (think of what started to happen when this even began to be approximated in the '60s). And, on the other hand, the feeling that work is a moral value in itself, and that anyone not willing to submit themselves to some kind of intense work discipline for most of their waking hours deserves nothing, is extraordinarily convenient for them.

Once, when contemplating the apparently endless growth of administrative responsibilities in British academic departments, I came up with one possible vision of hell. Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don't like and are not especially good at. Say they were hired because they were excellent cabinet-makers, and then discover they are expected to spend a great deal of their time frying fish. Neither does the task really need to be done—at least, there's only a very limited number of fish that need to be fried. Yet somehow, they all become so obsessed with resentment at the thought that some of their co-workers might be spending more time making cabinets, and not doing their fair share of the fish-frying responsibilities, that before long there's endless piles of useless badly cooked fish piling up all over the workshop and it's all that anyone really does. I think this is actually a pretty accurate description of the moral dynamics of our own economy.

Now, I realise any such argument is going to run into immediate objections: ‘who are you to say what jobs are really “necessary”? What's necessary anyway? You're an anthropology professor, what's the “need” for that?’ (And indeed a lot of tabloid readers would take the existence of my job as the very definition of wasteful social expenditure.) And on one level, this is obviously true. There can be no objective measure of social value.

I would not presume to tell someone who is convinced they are making a meaningful contribution to the world that, really, they are not. But what about those people who are themselves convinced their jobs are meaningless? Not long ago I got back in touch with a school friend who I hadn't seen since I was 12. I was amazed to discover that in the interim, he had become first a poet, then the front man in an indie rock band. I'd heard some of his songs on the radio having no idea the singer was someone I actually knew. He was obviously brilliant, innovative, and his work had unquestionably brightened and improved the lives of people all over the world. Yet, after a couple of unsuccessful albums, he'd lost his contract, and plagued with debts and a newborn daughter, ended up, as he put it, ‘taking the default choice of so many directionless folk: law school.’ Now he's a corporate lawyer working in a prominent New York firm. He was the first to admit that his job was utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist.

There's a lot of questions one could ask here, starting with, what does it say about our society that it seems to generate an extremely limited demand for talented poet-musicians, but an apparently infinite demand for specialists in corporate law? (Answer: if 1% of the population controls most of the disposable wealth, what we call ‘the market’ reflects what they think is useful or important, not anybody else.) But even more, it shows that most people in these jobs are ultimately aware of it. In fact, I'm not sure I've ever met a corporate lawyer who didn't think their job was bullshit. The same goes for almost all the new industries outlined above. There is a whole class of salaried professionals that, should you meet them at parties and admit that you do something that might be considered interesting (an anthropologist, for example), will want to avoid even discussing their line of work entirely (one or t'other?) Give them a few drinks, and they will launch into tirades about how pointless and stupid their job really is.

In the year 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by century's end, technology would have advanced sufficiently that countries like Great Britain or the United States would have achieved a 15-hour work week. There's every reason to believe he was right. In technological terms, we are quite capable of this. And yet it didn't happen. Instead, technology has been marshaled, if anything, to figure out ways to make us all work more. In order to achieve this, jobs have had to be created that are, effectively, pointless. Huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed. The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it.

Why did Keynes' promised utopia—still being eagerly awaited in the '60s—never materialise? The standard line today is that he didn't figure in the massive increase in consumerism. Given the choice between less hours and more toys and pleasures, we've collectively chosen the latter. This presents a nice morality tale, but even a moment's reflection shows it can't really be true. Yes, we have witnessed the creation of an endless variety of new jobs and industries since the '20s, but very few have anything to do with the production and distribution of sushi, iPhones, or fancy sneakers.

So what are these new jobs, precisely? A recent report comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 gives us a clear picture (and I note, one pretty much exactly echoed in the UK). Over the course of the last century, the number of workers employed as domestic servants, in industry, and in the farm sector has collapsed dramatically. At the same time, ‘professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers’ tripled, growing ‘from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment.’ In other words, productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away (even if you count industrial workers globally, including the toiling masses in India and China, such workers are still not nearly so large a percentage of the world population as they used to be.)

But rather than allowing a massive reduction of working hours to free the world's population to pursue their own projects, pleasures, visions, and ideas, we have seen the ballooning of not even so much of the ‘service’ sector as of the administrative sector, up to and including the creation of whole new industries like financial services or telemarketing, or the unprecedented expansion of sectors like corporate law, academic and health administration, human resources, and public relations. And these numbers do not even reflect on all those people whose job is to provide administrative, technical, or security support for these industries, or for that matter the whole host of ancillary industries (dog-washers, all-night pizza delivery) that only exist because everyone else is spending so much of their time working in all the other ones.

These are what I propose to call ‘bullshit jobs’.

It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs just for the sake of keeping us all working. And here, precisely, lies the mystery. In capitalism, this is precisely what is not supposed to happen. Sure, in the old inefficient socialist states like the Soviet Union, where employment was considered both a right and a sacred duty, the system made up as many jobs as they had to (this is why in Soviet department stores it took three clerks to sell a piece of meat). But, of course, this is the sort of very problem market competition is supposed to fix. According to economic theory, at least, the last thing a profit-seeking firm is going to do is shell out money to workers they don't really need to employ. Still, somehow, it happens.

While corporations may engage in ruthless downsizing, the layoffs and speed-ups invariably fall on that class of people who are actually making, moving, fixing and maintaining things; through some strange alchemy no one can quite explain, the number of salaried paper-pushers ultimately seems to expand, and more and more employees find themselves, not unlike Soviet workers actually, working 40 or even 50 hour weeks on paper, but effectively working 15 hours just as Keynes predicted, since the rest of their time is spent organizing or attending motivational seminars, updating their facebook profiles or downloading TV box-sets.

The answer clearly isn't economic: it's moral and political. The ruling class has figured out that a happy and productive population with free time on their hands is a mortal danger (think of what started to happen when this even began to be approximated in the '60s). And, on the other hand, the feeling that work is a moral value in itself, and that anyone not willing to submit themselves to some kind of intense work discipline for most of their waking hours deserves nothing, is extraordinarily convenient for them.

Once, when contemplating the apparently endless growth of administrative responsibilities in British academic departments, I came up with one possible vision of hell. Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don't like and are not especially good at. Say they were hired because they were excellent cabinet-makers, and then discover they are expected to spend a great deal of their time frying fish. Neither does the task really need to be done—at least, there's only a very limited number of fish that need to be fried. Yet somehow, they all become so obsessed with resentment at the thought that some of their co-workers might be spending more time making cabinets, and not doing their fair share of the fish-frying responsibilities, that before long there's endless piles of useless badly cooked fish piling up all over the workshop and it's all that anyone really does. I think this is actually a pretty accurate description of the moral dynamics of our own economy.

Now, I realise any such argument is going to run into immediate objections: ‘who are you to say what jobs are really “necessary”? What's necessary anyway? You're an anthropology professor, what's the “need” for that?’ (And indeed a lot of tabloid readers would take the existence of my job as the very definition of wasteful social expenditure.) And on one level, this is obviously true. There can be no objective measure of social value.

I would not presume to tell someone who is convinced they are making a meaningful contribution to the world that, really, they are not. But what about those people who are themselves convinced their jobs are meaningless? Not long ago I got back in touch with a school friend who I hadn't seen since I was 12. I was amazed to discover that in the interim, he had become first a poet, then the front man in an indie rock band. I'd heard some of his songs on the radio having no idea the singer was someone I actually knew. He was obviously brilliant, innovative, and his work had unquestionably brightened and improved the lives of people all over the world. Yet, after a couple of unsuccessful albums, he'd lost his contract, and plagued with debts and a newborn daughter, ended up, as he put it, ‘taking the default choice of so many directionless folk: law school.’ Now he's a corporate lawyer working in a prominent New York firm. He was the first to admit that his job was utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist.

There's a lot of questions one could ask here, starting with, what does it say about our society that it seems to generate an extremely limited demand for talented poet-musicians, but an apparently infinite demand for specialists in corporate law? (Answer: if 1% of the population controls most of the disposable wealth, what we call ‘the market’ reflects what they think is useful or important, not anybody else.) But even more, it shows that most people in these jobs are ultimately aware of it. In fact, I'm not sure I've ever met a corporate lawyer who didn't think their job was bullshit. The same goes for almost all the new industries outlined above. There is a whole class of salaried professionals that, should you meet them at parties and admit that you do something that might be considered interesting (an anthropologist, for example), will want to avoid even discussing their line of work entirely (one or t'other?) Give them a few drinks, and they will launch into tirades about how pointless and stupid their job really is.

This is a profound psychological violence here. How can one even begin to speak of dignity in labour when one secretly feels one's job should not exist? How can it not create a sense of deep rage and resentment. Yet it is the peculiar genius of our society that its rulers have figured out a way, as in the case of the fish-fryers, to ensure that rage is directed precisely against those who actually do get to do meaningful work. For instance: in our society, there seems a general rule that, the more obviously one's work benefits other people, the less one is likely to be paid for it. Again, an objective measure is hard to find, but one easy way to get a sense is to ask: what would happen were this entire class of people to simply disappear? Say what you like about nurses, garbage collectors, or mechanics, it's obvious that were they to vanish in a puff of smoke, the results would be immediate and catastrophic. A world without teachers or dock-workers would soon be in trouble, and even one without science fiction writers or ska musicians would clearly be a lesser place. It's not entirely clear how humanity would suffer were all private equity CEOs, lobbyists, PR researchers, actuaries, telemarketers, bailiffs or legal consultants to similarly vanish. (Many suspect it might markedly improve.) Yet apart from a handful of well-touted exceptions (doctors), the rule holds surprisingly well.

Even more perverse, there seems to be a broad sense that this is the way things should be. This is one of the secret strengths of right-wing populism. You can see it when tabloids whip up resentment against tube workers for paralysing London during contract disputes: the very fact that tube workers can paralyse London shows that their work is actually necessary, but this seems to be precisely what annoys people. It's even clearer in the US, where Republicans have had remarkable success mobilizing resentment against school teachers, or auto workers (and not, significantly, against the school administrators or auto industry managers who actually cause the problems) for their supposedly bloated wages and benefits. It's as if they are being told ‘but you get to teach children! Or make cars! You get to have real jobs! And on top of that you have the nerve to also expect middle-class pensions and health care?’

If someone had designed a work regime perfectly suited to maintaining the power of finance capital, it's hard to see how they could have done a better job. Real, productive workers are relentlessly squeezed and exploited. The remainder are divided between a terrorised stratum of the, universally reviled, unemployed and a larger stratum who are basically paid to do nothing, in positions designed to make them identify with the perspectives and sensibilities of the ruling class (managers, administrators, etc.)—and particularly its financial avatars—but, at the same time, foster a simmering resentment against anyone whose work has clear and undeniable social value. Clearly, the system was never consciously designed. It emerged from almost a century of trial and error. But it is the only explanation for why, despite our technological capacities, we are not all working 3–4 hour days.
 
"A Virgin Media database containing the personal details of 900,000 people was left unsecured and accessible online for 10 months, the company has admitted."

The breach was not due to a hack or a criminal attack, but because the database had been "incorrectly configured" by a member of staff not following the correct procedures, Virgin Media said.
Which shows yet again people still don't get that digital security is not about giving people enormous power and writing a policy and process document that basically says thou shalt not f**k up.

A database does not spend 10 months unsecured because it was "incorrectly configured". It gets to spend 10 months unsecured becasuse a) your 'process' allowed the mistake to be made in the first place and didn't have enough automated and human checking and b) more importantly because someone didn't have effective monitoring and regular scanning of their assets in place to catch the problem later and sound the alarm.

An industrial site does not get burgled "because someone left the window opened for 10 months", it gets burgled because someone didn't have their security doing basic commonsense daily checks and closing it". Ditto in digital space.

#security #rant #virgin #verminmedia
 
"A Virgin Media database containing the personal details of 900,000 people was left unsecured and accessible online for 10 months, the company has admitted."

The breach was not due to a hack or a criminal attack, but because the database had been "incorrectly configured" by a member of staff not following the correct procedures, Virgin Media said.
Which shows yet again people still don't get that digital security is not about giving people enormous power and writing a policy and process document that basically says thou shalt not f**k up.

A database does not spend 10 months unsecured because it was "incorrectly configured". It gets to spend 10 months unsecured becasuse a) your 'process' allowed the mistake to be made in the first place and didn't have enough automated and human checking and b) more importantly because someone didn't have effective monitoring and regular scanning of their assets in place to catch the problem later and sound the alarm.

An industrial site does not get burgled "because someone left the window opened for 10 months", it gets burgled because someone didn't have their security doing basic commonsense daily checks and closing it". Ditto in digital space.

#security #rant #virgin #verminmedia
 

Mailexperten...


Folgende Situation: (Mail-)Dienstleister von $KUNDE schickt mir eine Mail:
Hallo Mark,

könntest du mich einmal zurückrufen bitte, ich habe nochmal eine Nachfrage bezüglich dem Shop und Mailversand. Vielen Dank.
Ich sage ihm Telefonate sind hier mittlerweile - Gruppentelefone - eher unüblich und bitte ihn doch einfach erstmal die Nachfragen/Infos per Mail zu schicken (und wundere mich im Stillen wieso jemand das nicht direkt in der Mail geschrieben hat - noch dazu als Dienstleister in Sachen Mail).

Stellt sich dann heraus dass er plötzlich viele Mails aus dem Shop des Kunden bekommt, woran das denn liegen könne? Ich bitte ihm um alle Header einer Beispielmail um herauszufinden woher die Mails denn stammen (peinlich genug dass ich eine solche Bitte überhaupt vortragen muss - und auch erst weitere Informationen ihm aus der Nase ziehen muss, z.B. seit wann das Problem besteht). Was bekomme ich da? Header, die nur zeigen was nach der Einlieferung/Weiterleitung passiert ist. Woher die Mails kommen steht da nicht. Der Mailexperte bittet immer noch um Rückruf um seine "CSV", die er generiert hat, zu analyisieren.

Ich analysiere statt dessen die Maillogs des Postfix, der als Relay bei uns läuft und an seinen Smarthost ausliefert: Tut er vollkommen richtig, die Weiterleitung findet also nach der Einlieferung in seinem Mailsystem statt. Darauf habe ich keinen Zugriff, ich werde auch nicht vom Kunden dafür bezahlt dass ich die Mailprobleme seines bezahlten Dienstleisters analysiere.

Himmel.. ein Maildiensteister der nicht per Mail kommunizieren will, keine Header analyiseren kann und der Hilfe von außen braucht um seine eigenen Mailprobleme zu lösen. :scream_cat:

#rant
#rant
 
Wir Machen Druck auf den Kunden




Zum letztjährigen Chaos Communication Congress in Leipzig, nahm ich ein Bündel Ada Lovelace – Code Like A Girl Sticker und Buttons mit. Diese waren tatsächlich sehr begehrt und waren ebenfalls schnell vergriffen. Aus dieser Motivation heraus, wollte ich für den dies jährigen Congress nicht nur wieder die Ada Sticker mitnehmen, sondern das Portfolio erweitern, um Frauen aus dem MINT Bereich hervorheben und sichtbar machen. Die Gestaltung hat mir viel Spaß bereitet, der Druck hingegen weniger. Ich möchte hierfür meine Leidensgeschichte aufschreiben und meinen Frust gegenüber einem deutschen Unternehmen kundgeben und den aktuellen Stand ausrichten.

TL;DR
Die Sticker kommen in einer von mir gewünschten Qualität und jede Person, die mich supportet hat, erhält auch kurz nach dem Erhalt sein Päckchen.

Normalerweise drucke ich meine Sticker bei Sticker Mule. Dafür gibt es mehrere Gründe. Es fängt beim offensichtlichen an. Die Qualität ist grandios. Farben stimmen, der Druck ist sehr hochwertig, der Schnitt war immer wie gewünscht und es gibt nichts zu beanstanden. Es kam nur einmal zu der Situation, dass ich etwas reklamieren musste, weil der Druck leicht fehlschlug. Eine E-Mail später waren neue Sticker unterwegs und ich war sehr zufrieden. Fehler können entstehen, dies ist menschlich und auf manche Situationen hat man keinen Einfluss. Das nehme ich keiner Person oder Unternehmen übel. Der weitere Vorteil ist das ich als Artist unter Linux mit Open Source Tools, unkompliziert die Grafiken drucken und stanzen kann. Das soll jetzt keine reine Werbung für Sticker Mule sein, denn ich fand letztens ein dänisches Unternehmen mit einer vergleichbaren Qualität. StickerApp konnte mir eine gesonderte Fuhre an Sticker bereitstellen, welche ich als limitierte Version mit zum 36C3 mitnehme. Die Prozedur war hier ebenfalls einfach und unkompliziert. Das einzige, was bei beiden auffällt, ist der Preis welcher zu Buche schlägt. Der übersteigt oft die einfache Druckerei. Eigentlich wünscht man sich das so. Ich habe eine SVG, PNG oder PDF und diese wird mir ordentlich gedruckt, ohne groß kommunizieren zu müssen. Und dann gibt es noch unternehmen wie, Wir Machen Druck.

Eigentlich hätte ich da nicht bestellen wollen, aber bei der menge und meinen derzeit geringen Geld musste ich einen Kompromiss machen. Die Druckqualität ist nicht die beste, aber ausreichend, damit ich mich nicht schämen muss. Ich hatte bereits die Ada Lovelace Sticker von WMD auf der GPN 19 in Karlsruhe mit und die Personen welche zugriffen waren begeistert. Ich bin mit keinem Sticker nach Hause gefahren. So möchte ich dies auch. Doch die Bestellung der diesjährigen Sticker bei WMD war eine Katastrophe. Ich weiß nicht wo ich anfangen soll. Vielleicht bei der furchtbar überladenen Webseite, in welcher man keine Übersicht hat? Es ist recht schwer das zu finden, was man suchen möchte. Teils funktionieren die Hinweise für den Druck nicht oder die eingebauten Javascript failen. Nach einer längeren Prozedur kam ich zu einer gesamt Bestellung von ca. 300 Euro, im welcher fünf Portraits, ein Sticker Bogen, und die vereinzelten Motive in den Druck gingen.

[video width=”640″ height=”360″ mp4=”http://www.elektrollart.org/wp-content/uploads/final.mp4″ preload=”none”][/video]

Ich habe mir die Sticker zur Arbeit geliefert, damit ich diese gleich in meiner freien Zeit überprüfen kann. Da lagen nun mehrere Päckchen auf meinen Schreibtisch. Jedes Motiv einzeln verpackt und versendet. Dabei war es nicht komplett, den es fehlten sogar noch zwei Motive. Hierfür wurde die Spedition noch zweimal rausgeschickt. Wieso die nicht alles auf ein Lieferschein und ein Paket packen, damit die Spedition nur ein Paket transportieren muss, ist mir nicht ersichtlich.

Dann kam es zur Enttäuschung. Die Ada Lovelace Sticker hatten einen schwarzen Rand und das ohne Grund. In der originalen Grafik, welche ich bereits zur GPN benutzt habe, existiert kein schwarzer Rand und beim letzten Druck gab es keine Probleme hiermit. Die Tschunk and root Sticker hatten hierfür weiße Ränder. Die Hackbrett Sticker wurden schief ausgeschnitten, die don`t drink and root Sticker hingegen waren zu 50% beschädigt. Offensichtliche Kratzer, die Abnutzung der obersten Schicht war gut ersichtlich. Die Marie Curie und Grace Hopper Sitkcer waren in solch einer schlechten Qualität, dass man die Farbunterschiede nicht sehen kann. Somit sind Schattierungen und Highlights kaum zu erkennen. Zur gleichen Zeit erhielt ich ein Druck von StickerApp, in welcher die Schattierungen und Highlights gut erkennbar sind. Bei den neu bestellten Sticker bei Sticker Mule erwarte ich eine ähnlich gute Qualität wie bei StickerApp. Die Stickerbögen sind so grob gedruckt worden, das man meinen könnte, es wurde versucht mit Tinte auf Küchenrolle zu malen.

Bild/Foto
Unsymetrischer Schnitt der Kontur
Bild/Foto
Weißer Rand
Bild/Foto
Durch schlechte Druckqualität Schattierung Highlights nicht erkennar
Bild/Foto
In der Ansteckblume sollen eigentlich dunkle Linien sein
Bild/Foto
offensichtliche Schäden
Bild/Foto
Schwarze Kontur
Bild/Foto
Nicht ganz abgeschnitten und schlechte Druckqualität
Also erstmal reklamieren, jedoch habe ich nicht damit gerechnet, dass das Reklamation-verfahren der Qualität der Webseite sehr ähnelt. Um eine Reklamation der Bestellung anzustoßen, muss erst eine E-Mail an Reklamation@wir-machen-druck.de mit der Bestellnummer geschickt werden. Leider wirkt das FAQ hierbei so, als wäre dies die Reklamation selber. Jedoch musste ich mich hierbei irren. Ich schrieb vergeblich mein Anliegen im Detail und Anhang an die genannte E-Mail-Adresse. Nach dem Absenden der Mail wird nur lediglich die Reklamationsfunktion bei den jeweiligen Bestellungen freigeschaltet. Dort kann dann alles noch einmal formulieren und neu versenden. Gesagt getan. Ich reklamierte alles erneut…einzeln.

Dann kam es zur ernüchternder Erkenntnis, wieso WMD mit einer Reklamations Quote von 2% wirbt. WMD versucht mit jedem Trick die Reklamationen zu verhindern, anstelle deren schlechte Qualität einzugestehen werden ausreden gesucht. So wird unter Anderem der gewählte »hochwertige Qualitätsdruck« in schlechter Qualität als normal angesehen. Wir sprechen in diesem Fall von der schlechten Druckqualität beim Marie Curie und Grace Hopper Sticker, im welchen der Farbkontrast quasi nicht mehr vorhanden ist und die Schattierung/Highlights nicht mehr zu sehen sind. Hier bittet man mir an, einfach neu zu bestellen und alles zu bezahlen. Die fast 50 % an beschädigten Drucke der »don’t drink and root« Sticker wollen die mir nur mit fast 25 % des Kaufpreises erstatten. Über die Tschunk Sticker kann man sich gerne streiten, ich frage mich nur dann woher die Outlines bei den Ada Stickern herkommen und wieso der Fehlschnitt bei den Hackbrett Stickern hingegen akzeptiert werden? Noch interessanter ist, wieso dem Bild an einer stelle, dem schwarzen Rahmen mehr Pixel zu gewiesen wurde, als in der originalen Grafik? Bei den Stickerbögen wird argumentiert, dass WMD die Rastergrafik runter skaliert wurde. Und hier wurde ich stußig. Ich habe defentiv eine Vektorgrafik versendet. Laut der Qualitätsprüfung wurde die Vektorgrafik als Raster verkleinert. Dies kann tatsächlich zu Qualitätsschwund führen, aber dann liegt der Fehler mit Ansage und Bestätigung bei WMD und nicht an der Vektorgrafik. Mir wurde in einer separaten Mail nochmals bestätigt, dass WMD die Vektorgrafik ohne Rücksprache modifiziert hat und in den Druck verschickt haben. Bei meiner Bekannten hatten die hingegen immer alles beanstandet und sich sofort gemeldet, wenn die Grafik um wenige mm abwich und den Druck nicht angestoßen.

In fast allen fällen weigert sich WMD den schaden tatsächlich zu aktzeptieren und das frustriert mich sehr. Für die rund 300 Euro die ich bei WMD verbrannt habe, boten die mir eine entschädigung von insgesamt 20 Euro an und bei allen anderen Fehlern, einen neuen Druck bei dennen ich mich an den Kosten beteiligen soll. Sonst herrscht ein großes schweigen.

Die Kommunikation mit WMD ist auch nicht die beste. Wenn die mal auf Mails antworten, löschen Sie die bestehende Kommunikation und ich kann diese selber zusammen bauen, um nachzuvollziehen, was bereits besprochen wurde bzw. was ich geantwortet habe. Da jede Reklamation einzeln abgehandelt wird, bin ich völlig entnervt am Suchen.

Ich fasse es mal zusammen. WMD macht es absichtlich umständlich eine Reklamation durchzuführen und diese wird zusätzlich mit versuchten Ausreden gespickt, die Kommunikation erschwert und jegliche Art von Reklamation vermieden.

Bild/Foto
2 Jahre alter Sticker by Sticker Mule. Qualität trotz feuchtigkeit und schäden ist weiterhin Top
Bild/Foto
StickerApp. Borde am Kragen erkennbar. Highlights und Schattierungen ersichtlich
Damit wurde viel Geld für nichts ausgegeben. Besonders für alle die mich auf Twitter und Mastodon unterstützt haben, sowie mir Geld für den Druck zukommen ließen, ist dies ein Schlag ins Gesicht. Eigentlich wollte ich die Menge an Sticker mit diesem Geld erhöhen, um mehr Wesen eine Freude zu bereiten. Da ich dies nicht auf mir sitzen lassen möchte, packte ich nun in meine eisernen Geldreseven und lies die Porträts in einer größeren Menge erneut drucken, nun dieses Mal direkt bei Sticker Mule. Das Geld, welches man mir spendete, war eine große Hilfe und ich möchte mich bei jeder Person die mich supportet hat vom ganzen herzen bedanken. Ihr habt dafür gesorgt, dass ich die Menge an Sticker stemmen kann und trotz allen Problemen die geplante Menge mindestens verdoppelt habe. Auch wenn es noch mehr wäre, wenn WMD nicht so viele Probleme machen würde und so eine große Enttäuschung sei.

Aktuell sind viele Reklamationen von WMD zurückgezogen ohne Kommunikation oder ich kann nicht mehr darauf zugreifen. Auf meine Anfragen wurde nicht geantwortet und es wird kein Diskurs gesucht. Der letzte Stand ist, ich erhalte einen 40 Euro Gutschein für meine nächste Bestellung. Hier wird weiterhin meine Reklamation ignoriert und unterm Tepprich gekehrt.

Auf dem Repo habe ich unter Print nun auch alle Dateien entfernt, welche für den Druck bei WMD ausgelegt waren und wurden durch jene ersetzt, welche bei Sticke Mule einwandfrei gedruckt werden konnten.

Sobald die Sticker Mule Bestellung bei mir angekommen ist, verschicke ich an alle Supporter die gewünschte Menge an Sets. Bitte geduldet euch noch etwas. Ich hoffe, ihr habt Verständnis hierfür.

\#Blog #Blogartikel #wmd #wir-machen-druck #druck #print #sticker #36c3 #rant #blog
Quelle: https://www.elektrollart.org/?p=7183
 
Wir Machen Druck auf den Kunden




Zum letztjährigen Chaos Communication Congress in Leipzig, nahm ich ein Bündel Ada Lovelace – Code Like A Girl Sticker und Buttons mit. Diese waren tatsächlich sehr begehrt und waren ebenfalls schnell vergriffen. Aus dieser Motivation heraus, wollte ich für den dies jährigen Congress nicht nur wieder die Ada Sticker mitnehmen, sondern das Portfolio erweitern, um Frauen aus dem MINT Bereich hervorheben und sichtbar machen. Die Gestaltung hat mir viel Spaß bereitet, der Druck hingegen weniger. Ich möchte hierfür meine Leidensgeschichte aufschreiben und meinen Frust gegenüber einem deutschen Unternehmen kundgeben und den aktuellen Stand ausrichten.

TL;DR
Die Sticker kommen in einer von mir gewünschten Qualität und jede Person, die mich supportet hat, erhält auch kurz nach dem Erhalt sein Päckchen.

Normalerweise drucke ich meine Sticker bei Sticker Mule. Dafür gibt es mehrere Gründe. Es fängt beim offensichtlichen an. Die Qualität ist grandios. Farben stimmen, der Druck ist sehr hochwertig, der Schnitt war immer wie gewünscht und es gibt nichts zu beanstanden. Es kam nur einmal zu der Situation, dass ich etwas reklamieren musste, weil der Druck leicht fehlschlug. Eine E-Mail später waren neue Sticker unterwegs und ich war sehr zufrieden. Fehler können entstehen, dies ist menschlich und auf manche Situationen hat man keinen Einfluss. Das nehme ich keiner Person oder Unternehmen übel. Der weitere Vorteil ist das ich als Artist unter Linux mit Open Source Tools, unkompliziert die Grafiken drucken und stanzen kann. Das soll jetzt keine reine Werbung für Sticker Mule sein, denn ich fand letztens ein dänisches Unternehmen mit einer vergleichbaren Qualität. StickerApp konnte mir eine gesonderte Fuhre an Sticker bereitstellen, welche ich als limitierte Version mit zum 36C3 mitnehme. Die Prozedur war hier ebenfalls einfach und unkompliziert. Das einzige, was bei beiden auffällt, ist der Preis welcher zu Buche schlägt. Der übersteigt oft die einfache Druckerei. Eigentlich wünscht man sich das so. Ich habe eine SVG, PNG oder PDF und diese wird mir ordentlich gedruckt, ohne groß kommunizieren zu müssen. Und dann gibt es noch unternehmen wie, Wir Machen Druck.

Eigentlich hätte ich da nicht bestellen wollen, aber bei der menge und meinen derzeit geringen Geld musste ich einen Kompromiss machen. Die Druckqualität ist nicht die beste, aber ausreichend, damit ich mich nicht schämen muss. Ich hatte bereits die Ada Lovelace Sticker von WMD auf der GPN 19 in Karlsruhe mit und die Personen welche zugriffen waren begeistert. Ich bin mit keinem Sticker nach Hause gefahren. So möchte ich dies auch. Doch die Bestellung der diesjährigen Sticker bei WMD war eine Katastrophe. Ich weiß nicht wo ich anfangen soll. Vielleicht bei der furchtbar überladenen Webseite, in welcher man keine Übersicht hat? Es ist recht schwer das zu finden, was man suchen möchte. Teils funktionieren die Hinweise für den Druck nicht oder die eingebauten Javascript failen. Nach einer längeren Prozedur kam ich zu einer gesamt Bestellung von ca. 300 Euro, im welcher fünf Portraits, ein Sticker Bogen, und die vereinzelten Motive in den Druck gingen.

[video width=”640″ height=”360″ mp4=”http://www.elektrollart.org/wp-content/uploads/final.mp4″ preload=”none”][/video]

Ich habe mir die Sticker zur Arbeit geliefert, damit ich diese gleich in meiner freien Zeit überprüfen kann. Da lagen nun mehrere Päckchen auf meinen Schreibtisch. Jedes Motiv einzeln verpackt und versendet. Dabei war es nicht komplett, den es fehlten sogar noch zwei Motive. Hierfür wurde die Spedition noch zweimal rausgeschickt. Wieso die nicht alles auf ein Lieferschein und ein Paket packen, damit die Spedition nur ein Paket transportieren muss, ist mir nicht ersichtlich.

Dann kam es zur Enttäuschung. Die Ada Lovelace Sticker hatten einen schwarzen Rand und das ohne Grund. In der originalen Grafik, welche ich bereits zur GPN benutzt habe, existiert kein schwarzer Rand und beim letzten Druck gab es keine Probleme hiermit. Die Tschunk and root Sticker hatten hierfür weiße Ränder. Die Hackbrett Sticker wurden schief ausgeschnitten, die don`t drink and root Sticker hingegen waren zu 50% beschädigt. Offensichtliche Kratzer, die Abnutzung der obersten Schicht war gut ersichtlich. Die Marie Curie und Grace Hopper Sitkcer waren in solch einer schlechten Qualität, dass man die Farbunterschiede nicht sehen kann. Somit sind Schattierungen und Highlights kaum zu erkennen. Zur gleichen Zeit erhielt ich ein Druck von StickerApp, in welcher die Schattierungen und Highlights gut erkennbar sind. Bei den neu bestellten Sticker bei Sticker Mule erwarte ich eine ähnlich gute Qualität wie bei StickerApp. Die Stickerbögen sind so grob gedruckt worden, das man meinen könnte, es wurde versucht mit Tinte auf Küchenrolle zu malen.

Bild/Foto
Unsymetrischer Schnitt der Kontur
Bild/Foto
Weißer Rand
Bild/Foto
Durch schlechte Druckqualität Schattierung Highlights nicht erkennar
Bild/Foto
In der Ansteckblume sollen eigentlich dunkle Linien sein
Bild/Foto
offensichtliche Schäden
Bild/Foto
Schwarze Kontur
Bild/Foto
Nicht ganz abgeschnitten und schlechte Druckqualität
Also erstmal reklamieren, jedoch habe ich nicht damit gerechnet, dass das Reklamation-verfahren der Qualität der Webseite sehr ähnelt. Um eine Reklamation der Bestellung anzustoßen, muss erst eine E-Mail an Reklamation@wir-machen-druck.de mit der Bestellnummer geschickt werden. Leider wirkt das FAQ hierbei so, als wäre dies die Reklamation selber. Jedoch musste ich mich hierbei irren. Ich schrieb vergeblich mein Anliegen im Detail und Anhang an die genannte E-Mail-Adresse. Nach dem Absenden der Mail wird nur lediglich die Reklamationsfunktion bei den jeweiligen Bestellungen freigeschaltet. Dort kann dann alles noch einmal formulieren und neu versenden. Gesagt getan. Ich reklamierte alles erneut…einzeln.

Dann kam es zur ernüchternder Erkenntnis, wieso WMD mit einer Reklamations Quote von 2% wirbt. WMD versucht mit jedem Trick die Reklamationen zu verhindern, anstelle deren schlechte Qualität einzugestehen werden ausreden gesucht. So wird unter Anderem der gewählte »hochwertige Qualitätsdruck« in schlechter Qualität als normal angesehen. Wir sprechen in diesem Fall von der schlechten Druckqualität beim Marie Curie und Grace Hopper Sticker, im welchen der Farbkontrast quasi nicht mehr vorhanden ist und die Schattierung/Highlights nicht mehr zu sehen sind. Hier bittet man mir an, einfach neu zu bestellen und alles zu bezahlen. Die fast 50 % an beschädigten Drucke der »don’t drink and root« Sticker wollen die mir nur mit fast 25 % des Kaufpreises erstatten. Über die Tschunk Sticker kann man sich gerne streiten, ich frage mich nur dann woher die Outlines bei den Ada Stickern herkommen und wieso der Fehlschnitt bei den Hackbrett Stickern hingegen akzeptiert werden? Noch interessanter ist, wieso dem Bild an einer stelle, dem schwarzen Rahmen mehr Pixel zu gewiesen wurde, als in der originalen Grafik? Bei den Stickerbögen wird argumentiert, dass WMD die Rastergrafik runter skaliert wurde. Und hier wurde ich stußig. Ich habe defentiv eine Vektorgrafik versendet. Laut der Qualitätsprüfung wurde die Vektorgrafik als Raster verkleinert. Dies kann tatsächlich zu Qualitätsschwund führen, aber dann liegt der Fehler mit Ansage und Bestätigung bei WMD und nicht an der Vektorgrafik. Mir wurde in einer separaten Mail nochmals bestätigt, dass WMD die Vektorgrafik ohne Rücksprache modifiziert hat und in den Druck verschickt haben. Bei meiner Bekannten hatten die hingegen immer alles beanstandet und sich sofort gemeldet, wenn die Grafik um wenige mm abwich und den Druck nicht angestoßen.

In fast allen fällen weigert sich WMD den schaden tatsächlich zu aktzeptieren und das frustriert mich sehr. Für die rund 300 Euro die ich bei WMD verbrannt habe, boten die mir eine entschädigung von insgesamt 20 Euro an und bei allen anderen Fehlern, einen neuen Druck bei dennen ich mich an den Kosten beteiligen soll. Sonst herrscht ein großes schweigen.

Die Kommunikation mit WMD ist auch nicht die beste. Wenn die mal auf Mails antworten, löschen Sie die bestehende Kommunikation und ich kann diese selber zusammen bauen, um nachzuvollziehen, was bereits besprochen wurde bzw. was ich geantwortet habe. Da jede Reklamation einzeln abgehandelt wird, bin ich völlig entnervt am Suchen.

Ich fasse es mal zusammen. WMD macht es absichtlich umständlich eine Reklamation durchzuführen und diese wird zusätzlich mit versuchten Ausreden gespickt, die Kommunikation erschwert und jegliche Art von Reklamation vermieden.

Bild/Foto
2 Jahre alter Sticker by Sticker Mule. Qualität trotz feuchtigkeit und schäden ist weiterhin Top
Bild/Foto
StickerApp. Borde am Kragen erkennbar. Highlights und Schattierungen ersichtlich
Damit wurde viel Geld für nichts ausgegeben. Besonders für alle die mich auf Twitter und Mastodon unterstützt haben, sowie mir Geld für den Druck zukommen ließen, ist dies ein Schlag ins Gesicht. Eigentlich wollte ich die Menge an Sticker mit diesem Geld erhöhen, um mehr Wesen eine Freude zu bereiten. Da ich dies nicht auf mir sitzen lassen möchte, packte ich nun in meine eisernen Geldreseven und lies die Porträts in einer größeren Menge erneut drucken, nun dieses Mal direkt bei Sticker Mule. Das Geld, welches man mir spendete, war eine große Hilfe und ich möchte mich bei jeder Person die mich supportet hat vom ganzen herzen bedanken. Ihr habt dafür gesorgt, dass ich die Menge an Sticker stemmen kann und trotz allen Problemen die geplante Menge mindestens verdoppelt habe. Auch wenn es noch mehr wäre, wenn WMD nicht so viele Probleme machen würde und so eine große Enttäuschung sei.

Aktuell sind viele Reklamationen von WMD zurückgezogen ohne Kommunikation oder ich kann nicht mehr darauf zugreifen. Auf meine Anfragen wurde nicht geantwortet und es wird kein Diskurs gesucht. Der letzte Stand ist, ich erhalte einen 40 Euro Gutschein für meine nächste Bestellung. Hier wird weiterhin meine Reklamation ignoriert und unterm Tepprich gekehrt.

Auf dem Repo habe ich unter Print nun auch alle Dateien entfernt, welche für den Druck bei WMD ausgelegt waren und wurden durch jene ersetzt, welche bei Sticke Mule einwandfrei gedruckt werden konnten.

Sobald die Sticker Mule Bestellung bei mir angekommen ist, verschicke ich an alle Supporter die gewünschte Menge an Sets. Bitte geduldet euch noch etwas. Ich hoffe, ihr habt Verständnis hierfür.

\#Blog #Blogartikel #wmd #wir-machen-druck #druck #print #sticker #36c3 #rant #blog
Quelle: https://www.elektrollart.org/?p=7183
 
Tilo Jung rockt :-D

#TiloJung #DJV #rant

Der Deutsche Journalisten-Verband (DJV) hat anlässlich seiner Jubiläumsfeier („70 Jahre DJV“) Tilo Jung für ein Podiumsgespräch eingeladen. Und der wäscht der Organisation und deren Spitze tüchtig und in unverblümter Direktheit den Kopf. Jung kritisiert die seiner Meinung nach unglückliche Vorgehensweise des DJV beim Kommentar zum Rezo-Video, die nicht genügende Trennschärfe von Journalismus und PR, die ausgebliebene Solidarität mit dem seinerzeit inhaftierten Journalisten Billy Six und die wiederholt nötigen Berichtigungen und Löschungen von fehlerhaften Statements. Jung wünscht sich ausdrücklich einen Wechsel an der Führungsspitze des Verbands: „Der Fisch stinkt vom Kopf her.“

-- via https://bildblog.de/115858/tilo-jung-kritisiert-djv-f-wie-falschheit-nachhilfe-thread/


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TtM4H8VYNEE&feature=youtu.be&t=985

YouTube: YouTube (Jörg Wagner)

Europa 
Man, man, man. Embedded systems Anfängerfehler: Schreiben der Logs auf das Flash.

… ein mal mit Profies …

"Unsere Lösung, euer Problem"

#tesla #rant

Unbenutzbare Tesla-Elektroautos: Teslas Flash-Fehlkonstruktion #Tesla
Europa 
Tja, so sieht das aus, wenn $Company eine eigene #Atlassian #Confluence Instanz betreibt. Selbst da will man eine #Javascript Blocker einsetzen…

Was stimmt eigentlich mit Atlassian nicht?

#rant #js privacy

Europa 
"We have noticed that you are using adblocker"

This is what another website said to me a minute ago. Then it asked to whitelist them.

Dear website, you are wrong. I am not using ad blocker. I use some anti-tracking functionality in my browser. I don't even have control on most part of it unless I want to pop up the hood and go really deep in there. Also I use some blacklisting of especially abusive ads and trackers on my router. Sorry, I can't whitelist you, there is simply no easy click of a button to do so.

And you know, website, it took years and years, decades even to develop this sort of environment you find yourself running in. At first I was even glad to see banners. They were fun to see. Then as years went by I installed ad blocker. It was really simple back then. Then it just went on and on - and here we are. You are not whitelistable. Most likely your ads won't display even on unfiltered direct connection and clean Firefox install with default settings.

So what can I do? Ask yourself, dear website, how have you driven all of us to this. Sure as hell it wasn't me.

Now when we have this cleared I am going to look for an easy way to bypass your "anti-adblock" shield. I won't even bother using any dedicated tools for that. If in about 30 seconds I won't see the content I want I will close the page and move on. Also I'll make a mental note not to click on your links again because of this.

How to fix this, you ask me? I don't know. Maybe accept the fact that ads are so last century? How about dropping these user tracking annoyingly contextual ads altogether and try something else? Like, you know, conscious advertising? Like old school magazines (the ones on paper) did?

And DoubleClick and friends can go fuck themselves. Ad banners are dinosaurs and the business feels chilly because the asteroid already hit.

#ads #adblock #internet #rant
 
"We have noticed that you are using adblocker"

This is what another website said to me a minute ago. Then it asked to whitelist them.

Dear website, you are wrong. I am not using ad blocker. I use some anti-tracking functionality in my browser. I don't even have control on most part of it unless I want to pop up the hood and go really deep in there. Also I use some blacklisting of especially abusive ads and trackers on my router. Sorry, I can't whitelist you, there is simply no easy click of a button to do so.

And you know, website, it took years and years, decades even to develop this sort of environment you find yourself running in. At first I was even glad to see banners. They were fun to see. Then as years went by I installed ad blocker. It was really simple back then. Then it just went on and on - and here we are. You are not whitelistable. Most likely your ads won't display even on unfiltered direct connection and clean Firefox install with default settings.

So what can I do? Ask yourself, dear website, how have you driven all of us to this. Sure as hell it wasn't me.

Now when we have this cleared I am going to look for an easy way to bypass your "anti-adblock" shield. I won't even bother using any dedicated tools for that. If in about 30 seconds I won't see the content I want I will close the page and move on. Also I'll make a mental note not to click on your links again because of this.

How to fix this, you ask me? I don't know. Maybe accept the fact that ads are so last century? How about dropping these user tracking annoyingly contextual ads altogether and try something else? Like, you know, conscious advertising? Like old school magazines (the ones on paper) did?

And DoubleClick and friends can go fuck themselves. Ad banners are dinosaurs and the business feels chilly because the asteroid already hit.

#ads #adblock #internet #rant
 

GPG Encryption Key -> Cards (Yubikeys)


#gnupg #rant
 

Raser sind ein Problem, wenn die Opfer Autofahrer sind


<rant>
Es ist kein Zufall, daß in Berlin zwei Raser wegen Mordes verurteilt wurden, wie auch in Hamburg ein Raser, während in Köln zwei Raser nur wegen fahrlässiger Tötung für zwei Jahre bzw. weniger ins Gefängnis gehen. Das Opfer der Berliner Raser war ein Jeep-Fahrer, 69. Auch das Todesopfer in Hamburg, 22, war Autoinsasse. Die Kölnerin Miriam, 19, war dagegen Radfahrerin. Der mutmaßliche Todesfahrer von Moers, 21, kann sich auf etwas gefaßt machen, wenn man ihm denn habhaft wird. Die Frau, 43, deren Tötung er verdächtig ist, saß im Auto. Wäre sie Radfahrerin gewesen, müßte man erstmal klären, ob ihr Licht am Fahrrad überhaupt funktionierte und man hätte gefragt, warum sie denn keinen Helm trug.
</rant>

#raser #verkehr #autowahn #fahrrad #berlin #hamburg #moers #helm #rant #mord #autorennen
 
Bild/Foto
100 Puls.
Ich habe in meinem langen Leben bislang intensiver gearbeitet mit CP/M, DOS, Windows angefangen mit 3.0, seit Win 95 nicht mehr, NextStep, OpenStep, Solaris, Linux, OSX…

Und ich schwöre: Ich habe noch NIE ein derartig dysfunktionales Desktop-OS gesehen wie Windows in allen Inkarnationen, noch nie.

Keine Ahnung, wie schwer die Kindheit gewesen sein muß, um Windows für irgendetwas in Erwägung zu ziehen, auf das man sich jederzeit verlassen können möchte.

#Rant
#Rant
 
Die Deutsche Wohnen hat 2018 einen Gewinn von 480 Millionen Euro gemacht. Die Deutsche Wohnen hat einen Wohnungsbestand von 160000 Wohnungen. Macht pro Wohnung einen Gewinn von 3000€ im Jahr. Oder 250€/Monat und Wohnung. Zahlenquelle: ARD. Entweder sind die Zahlen Grütze oder die #DeutscheWohnen ist ein elender Drecksladen. Es gibt schließlich über eine Million Obdachlose in diesem Land. Mir scheint, das eine hat möglicherweise etwas mit dem anderen zu tun. Da wird bestimmt was gemacht. Es gibt schließlich ein Grundgesetz. Würde, Menschenrechte und so. Aber ein Wirtschaftsvertreter von der #CSU (Scheuer oder der vom Heimatmuseum), #CDU oder ihrem Koalitionspartner #SPD wird das Problem sicher angehen. Ganz bestimmt. Ganz sicher kommt das ganz oben auf die ToDo Liste. Für die nächste Legislatur. Oder die übernächste. Vielleicht auch erst kurz nach der BER-Eröffnung.
#Rant
 

Drupal..


Genau das entspricht meinen schlechten Erfahrungen mit Drupal: Updates . inklusive Sicherheitsupdates - sind de facto nicht möglich:
In der Regel ist es sinnvoll, Websites mit Drupal 8 komplett neu aufzubauen oder für kleinere Projekte auf ein anderes CMS – vielleicht auch einen statischen Seiten-Generator – umzusteigen.
Bei jedem Major-Release die gleiche Scheiße. Jedesmal versprechen die Devs dass das in Zukunft besser gehen wird:
Wer sich für Drupal 8 entscheidet, muss sich aber nicht sorgen, dass in wenigen Jahren schon wieder ein radikaler Umbruch droht. Projektmanager Dries Buytaert hat versprochen, dass das Upgrade von Drupal 8 auf Drupal 9 ganz einfach vonstattengehen soll, ebenso einfach wie etwa ein Upgrade von 8.x auf 8.x+1.
Klar. Als ob man diesen Versprechungen trauen könnte.
#drupal #rant
Drupal 7: Support endet im November 2021


Im Jahr 2021 erreicht Drupal 7 sein End of Life. Schon jetzt sollten Seitenbetreiber ihre Upgrade-Strategie planen – trivial ist ein Wechsel auf Drupal 8 nicht.
 
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