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Items tagged with: psychology

#Newhere all the way from a smokey town called Arbroath.

Once I learn how to drive this thing I will be posting about #philosophy #Science #history #psychology #Logic . I'm no expert on any these subjects, still very much a beginner, although, I like to think of myself as an advanced beginner.

My main interest is #philosophy. Over the past few years I've been reading the history and evolution of #GreekPhilosophy - #ModernPhilosophy - especially #ImmanuelKant and #DavidHume - #ScottishPhilosophy and #TheScottishEnlightenment.

So these are the kind of subjects I will be posting about, along with some #Art #Music and a shit sense of #humour.

Thanks for having me 😀
 
#Newhere all the way from a smokey town called Arbroath.

Once I learn how to drive this thing I will be posting about #philosophy #Science #history #psychology #Logic . I'm no expert on any these subjects, still very much a beginner, although, I like to think of myself as an advanced beginner.

My main interest is #philosophy. Over the past few years I've been reading the history and evolution of #GreekPhilosophy - #ModernPhilosophy - especially #ImmanuelKant and #DavidHume - #ScottishPhilosophy and #TheScottishEnlightenment.

So these are the kind of subjects I will be posting about, along with some #Art #Music and a shit sense of #humour.

Thanks for having me 😀
 
Introverts like mountains while extroverts like the flatlands, according to this research that graphs out flatness and extroversion by state and shows a relationship. Also they say extroverts like beaches while introverts like mountains.

I'm half-n-half -- neither introvert nor extrovert. (Apparently there's a word for this: "ambivert".) I land in the middle on the "introvert-extrovert" scale on Big 5 and Myers-Briggs personality tests, and it seem to fit as I can be by myself for hours and I don't mind and I can be with other people for hours and that's fine, too.

Having said that, the flatlands vs mountains theory is new to me and makes no sense. It seems like, some people, like my mom, like the "big sky" feeling that you get in a place that's very flat. Others like the scenic feeling from mountains. When you get very high up the scenery becomes quite dramatic.

My mom grew up in west Texas and I've been there many times to visit my grandparents and it is the flattest place I've ever been. The graph shows North Dakota as the flattest state, and I guess the problem here is they're using whole states and some like Texas are pretty big. Texas has some hills on it's eastern side where it borders Louisiana. But on the western side, well, I've been to both North Dakota and west Texas and I can tell you west Texas is flatter.

I live in Denver and maybe Denver is the perfect place for the half-n-half ambiverts who are neither introvert nor extrovert, but something in the middle. Look east, and you're on the flatlands. Look west and you're in the mountains.

Extroverts Prefer Plains, Introverts Like Mountains

#discoveries #psychology #personality
 
Introverts like mountains while extroverts like the flatlands, according to this research that graphs out flatness and extroversion by state and shows a relationship. Also they say extroverts like beaches while introverts like mountains.

I'm half-n-half -- neither introvert nor extrovert. (Apparently there's a word for this: "ambivert".) I land in the middle on the "introvert-extrovert" scale on Big 5 and Myers-Briggs personality tests, and it seem to fit as I can be by myself for hours and I don't mind and I can be with other people for hours and that's fine, too.

Having said that, the flatlands vs mountains theory is new to me and makes no sense. It seems like, some people, like my mom, like the "big sky" feeling that you get in a place that's very flat. Others like the scenic feeling from mountains. When you get very high up the scenery becomes quite dramatic.

My mom grew up in west Texas and I've been there many times to visit my grandparents and it is the flattest place I've ever been. The graph shows North Dakota as the flattest state, and I guess the problem here is they're using whole states and some like Texas are pretty big. Texas has some hills on it's eastern side where it borders Louisiana. But on the western side, well, I've been to both North Dakota and west Texas and I can tell you west Texas is flatter.

I live in Denver and maybe Denver is the perfect place for the half-n-half ambiverts who are neither introvert nor extrovert, but something in the middle. Look east, and you're on the flatlands. Look west and you're in the mountains.

Extroverts Prefer Plains, Introverts Like Mountains

#discoveries #psychology #personality
 

What’s next for psychology’s embattled field of social priming


TL;DR: It's still faking statistics and searching for ridiculous correlations.

#statistics #psychology
 
#psychology #bystander #debunk

How Often Will Bystanders Help Strangers in Need? - CityLab



It’s one of the most enduring urban myths of all: If you get in trouble, don’t count on anyone nearby to help. Research dating back to the late 1960s documents how the great majority of people who witness crimes or violent behavior refuse to intervene.

Psychologists dubbed this non-response as the “bystander effect”—a phenomenon which has been replicated in scores of subsequent psychological studies. The “bystander effect” holds that the reason people don’t intervene is because we look to one another. The presence of many bystanders diffuses our own sense of personal responsibility, leading people to essentially do nothing and wait for someone else to jump in.
[…]
The study finds that in nine out of 10 incidents, at least one bystander intervened, with an average of 3.8 interveners. There was also no significant difference across the three countries and cities, even though they differ greatly in levels of crime and violence.

Instead of more bystanders creating an immobilizing “bystander effect,” the study actually found the more bystanders there were, the more likely it was that at least someone would intervene to help.
 
#psychology #bystander #debunk

How Often Will Bystanders Help Strangers in Need? - CityLab



It’s one of the most enduring urban myths of all: If you get in trouble, don’t count on anyone nearby to help. Research dating back to the late 1960s documents how the great majority of people who witness crimes or violent behavior refuse to intervene.

Psychologists dubbed this non-response as the “bystander effect”—a phenomenon which has been replicated in scores of subsequent psychological studies. The “bystander effect” holds that the reason people don’t intervene is because we look to one another. The presence of many bystanders diffuses our own sense of personal responsibility, leading people to essentially do nothing and wait for someone else to jump in.
[…]
The study finds that in nine out of 10 incidents, at least one bystander intervened, with an average of 3.8 interveners. There was also no significant difference across the three countries and cities, even though they differ greatly in levels of crime and violence.

Instead of more bystanders creating an immobilizing “bystander effect,” the study actually found the more bystanders there were, the more likely it was that at least someone would intervene to help.
 

How I Almost Destroyed a £50 million War Plane and The Normalisation of Deviance. - Fast Jet Performance


#sociology #psychology #science #engineering
 

How I Almost Destroyed a £50 million War Plane and The Normalisation of Deviance. - Fast Jet Performance


#sociology #psychology #science #engineering
 
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