social.sokoll.com

Search

Items tagged with: privacy

Bild/Foto

INFOSEC: FUCK YOUR '"BLACK/WHITE NEUTRALITY"!

By Catalin Cimpanu for Zero Day | July 4, 2020

The information security (infosec) community has angrily reacted today to calls to abandon the use of the 'black hat' and 'white hat' terms, citing that the two, and especially 'black hat,' have nothing to do with racial stereotyping.



Discussions about the topic started late last night after David Kleidermacher, VP of Engineering at Google, and in charge of Android Security and the Google Play Store, withdrew from a scheduled talk he was set to give in August at the Black Hat USA 2020 security conference.

In his withdrawal announcement, Kleidermacher asked the infosec industry to consider replacing terms like black hat, white hat, and man-in-the-middle with neutral alternatives.

These changes remove harmful associations, promote inclusion, and help us break down walls of unconscious bias. Not everyone agrees which terms to change, but I feel strongly our language needs to (this one in particular).

— David Kleidermacher (@DaveKSecure) July 3, 2020

While Kleidermacher only asked the industry to consider changing these terms, several members mistook his statement as a direct request to the Black Hat conference to change its name.

With Black Hat being the biggest event in cyber-security, online discussions on the topic quickly became widespread among cyber-security experts, dominating the July 4th weekend.

While a part of the infosec community agreed with Kledermacher, the vast majority did not, and called it virtue signaling taken to the extreme.

Most security researchers pointed to the fact that the terms had nothing to do with racism or skin color, and had their origins in classic western movies, where the villain usually wore a black hat, while the good guy wore a white hat.

Others pointed to the dualism between black and white as representing evil and good, concepts that have been around since the dawn of civilizations, long before racial divides even existed between humans.

Right now, the infosec community doesn't seem to be willing to abandon the two terms, which they don't see as a problem when used in infosec-related writings.
MORE COMMENTS: https://www.zdnet.com/article/infosec-community-disagrees-with-changing-black-hat-term-due-to-racial-stereotyping/

#programming #computer #science #software #development #infosec #black hat #resistance #goggle #hackers #internet #censorship #freedom #sexism #social #web #human rights #sanctimony #activism #activist #correctness #meetoo #blacklivesmatter #racism #racist #USA #research #cyber-security #security #privacy
 
Bild/Foto

INFOSEC: FUCK YOUR '"BLACK/WHITE NEUTRALITY"!

By Catalin Cimpanu for Zero Day | July 4, 2020

The information security (infosec) community has angrily reacted today to calls to abandon the use of the 'black hat' and 'white hat' terms, citing that the two, and especially 'black hat,' have nothing to do with racial stereotyping.



Discussions about the topic started late last night after David Kleidermacher, VP of Engineering at Google, and in charge of Android Security and the Google Play Store, withdrew from a scheduled talk he was set to give in August at the Black Hat USA 2020 security conference.

In his withdrawal announcement, Kleidermacher asked the infosec industry to consider replacing terms like black hat, white hat, and man-in-the-middle with neutral alternatives.

These changes remove harmful associations, promote inclusion, and help us break down walls of unconscious bias. Not everyone agrees which terms to change, but I feel strongly our language needs to (this one in particular).

— David Kleidermacher (@DaveKSecure) July 3, 2020

While Kleidermacher only asked the industry to consider changing these terms, several members mistook his statement as a direct request to the Black Hat conference to change its name.

With Black Hat being the biggest event in cyber-security, online discussions on the topic quickly became widespread among cyber-security experts, dominating the July 4th weekend.

While a part of the infosec community agreed with Kledermacher, the vast majority did not, and called it virtue signaling taken to the extreme.

Most security researchers pointed to the fact that the terms had nothing to do with racism or skin color, and had their origins in classic western movies, where the villain usually wore a black hat, while the good guy wore a white hat.

Others pointed to the dualism between black and white as representing evil and good, concepts that have been around since the dawn of civilizations, long before racial divides even existed between humans.

Right now, the infosec community doesn't seem to be willing to abandon the two terms, which they don't see as a problem when used in infosec-related writings.
MORE COMMENTS: https://www.zdnet.com/article/infosec-community-disagrees-with-changing-black-hat-term-due-to-racial-stereotyping/

#programming #computer #science #software #development #infosec #black hat #resistance #goggle #hackers #internet #censorship #freedom #sexism #social #web #human rights #sanctimony #activism #activist #correctness #meetoo #blacklivesmatter #racism #racist #USA #research #cyber-security #security #privacy
 

Victory! German Mass Surveillance Abroad is Ruled Unconstitutional


#commentary #privacy #electronicfrontierfoundation #eff #digitalrights #digitalprivacy
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Victory! German Mass Surveillance Abroad is Ruled Unconstitutional


#commentary #privacy #electronicfrontierfoundation #eff #digitalrights #digitalprivacy
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 
The Original Cookie specification from 1997 was GDPR compliant (2019) The Original Cookie specification from 1997 was GDPR compliant (2019) - https://baekdal.com/thoughts/the-original-cookie-specification-from-1997-was-gdpr-compliant/
Tags: #privacy #GDPR #BeforeAllThisNonsense
 
The Original Cookie specification from 1997 was GDPR compliant (2019) The Original Cookie specification from 1997 was GDPR compliant (2019) - https://baekdal.com/thoughts/the-original-cookie-specification-from-1997-was-gdpr-compliant/
Tags: #privacy #GDPR #BeforeAllThisNonsense
 
[Privacy Issue] RAW recordings are created and stored, even if the meeting isn't recorded #9202 – https://github.com/bigbluebutton/bigbluebutton/issues/9202
#BigBlueButton #Datenschutz #Privacy
 
[Privacy Issue] RAW recordings are created and stored, even if the meeting isn't recorded #9202 – https://github.com/bigbluebutton/bigbluebutton/issues/9202
#BigBlueButton #Datenschutz #Privacy
 
(German translation below.)

If you're stuck at home and use Zoom as a video conferencing solution that works for you, that's fine. Keep using it. Here are some options you might want to check to enhance the overall security of your and your guests.

First, log in at https://zoom.us/signin and head to your settings at https://zoom.us/profile/setting.

* In the "Meeting" tab:
1. Set "Audio Type" to "Computer Audio". This will block people from using their phone to join a meeting - but that's required if you want to use End-to-End encryption all the time. Phones can't do encryption.
1. Make sure "Use Personal Meeting ID (PMI) when scheduling a meeting" is disabled. The PMI is a meeting ID that never changes, so don't use it. It should be disabled by default, but make sure.
1. Enable "Require a password for Personal Meeting ID (PMI)", so people can't join via your PMI even if you accidentally share it.
1. Make sure "Join before host" is disabled. If enabled, people can join your meetings before a host is there - meaning there won't be moderation.
1. Enable "Play sound when participants join or leave". That's useful, as everyone will be aware when someone joins unexpectedly.
1. Enable "Require Encryption for 3rd Party Endpoints (H323/SIP)".
* In the "Recording" tab:
1. Disable "Cloud recording". You can still record meetings to your local disk, but there is no need to store potentially private conversations on Zoom's servers.

If you have a more "presentation"-like format scheduled, where only you or a small number of presenters will be speaking to a high number of consuming participants, there are a couple of additional tips in addition to the settings above:

* Before the meeting: Require people to sign-up and collect their eMail addresses. Do not share the join-link publicly, and only send the credentials via eMail to the people who signed up.
* In the "Meeting" tab:
1. Enable "Mute participants upon entry" - this will force-mute everyone joining. You will have the option to decide whether people can speak or not.
1. Enable "Co-host" and promote someone you trust as Co-host to assist with muting/unmuting people as needed.
1. Set "Screen sharing" to "Host-Only" to avoid random people sharing their screens, which can be used for abuse. Promote people who need to share as Co-hosts, if you trust them.
1. Enable "Nonverbal feedback". This is useful if you have force-muted everyone. People can raise their hands if they want to say something, allowing you to unmute people for a short period.
1. Enable "Waiting room" for all participants if the nature of the call is sensitive/private. This means that people will not be able to join your meeting directly, but will be placed in a virtual waiting room, waiting for you to approve them to join the meeting. If you enable this, make sure to keep an eye on the participant list to avoid missing someone.
1. Make sure "Allow removed participants to rejoin" is disabled. This means that people that got kicked out of the meeting will not be able to rejoin, even if they know the credentials.
Wenn du zuhause festsitzt und Zoom als das Tool deiner Wahl für Videokonferenzen und Videotelefonate entdeckt hast, mach dir nicht zu viel Sorgen und bleibe dabei. Es ist wichtiger, ein Tool zu haben, dass stressfrei und problemlos die Aufgabe erledigt, als sich stundenlang mit Alternativen zu schlagen. Hier sind einige Tipps, wie du deine Meetings für dich und deine Teilnehmerinnen sicherer gestalten kannst.

Als Erstes, melde dich auf https://zoom.us/signin an und rufe deine Einstellungen unter https://zoom.us/profile/setting auf.

* Im "Meeting"-Tab:
1. Setze "Audiotyp" auf "Computeraudio". Damit deaktivierst du zwar die Möglichkeit, über ein Telefon am Meeting teilzunehmen, aber das ist wichtig, wenn du Ende-zu-Ende-Verschlüsselung verwenden willst. Telefone verstehen keine Verschlüsselung.
1. Stelle sicher, dass "Beim Planen eines Meetings die persönliche Meeting-ID (PMI) verwenden" nicht aktiv ist. Deine PMI ist eine Meeting-ID, die sich nie ändert, also sollte man davon besser die Finger lassen.
1. Schalte "Bei Personal-Meeting-ID (PMI) Kennwort verlangen" an, falls man doch mal versehentlich die fixe PMI weitergibt. Mit Kennwort kann dann trotzdem niemand das Meeting betreten.
1. Deaktiviere "Beitritt vor Moderator", dann können deine Gäste das Meeting erst betreten, wenn du da bist. Ist diese Option deaktiviert, können Leute ohne Moderation das Meeting betreten.
1. Aktiviere "Sound wiedergeben, wenn Teilnehmer teilnehmen oder verlassen". Dann wird immer, wenn eine Teilnehmerin beitritt, ein Ton für alle abgespielt. Damit wissen alle, wenn unerwartet jemand dazu kommt.
1. Aktiviere "Verschlüsselung für Endpunkte von Drittanbietern erforderlich (H323/SIP)".
* Im "Aufzeichnung"-Tab:
1. "Cloud-Aufzeichnung" ausschalten. Du kannst das Meeting immernoch auf deine Festplatte aufnehmen, aber es gibt keinen Grund, potenziell private Gespräche auf Zoom's Servern zu speichern.

Wenn man ein "vortragsähliches" Ding geplant hat, also ein Format in dem eine kleine Gruppe an Leuten aktiv zu einer großen, ggf. öffentlichen Gruppe spricht, gibt es zu den Einstellungen oben noch ein paar weitere Tipps:

* Vor dem Meeting: Stelle sicher, dass sich alle Teilnehmerinnen vor der Veranstaltung anmelden und sammle eMail-Adressen. Verteile den Zoom-Link oder die Meetingdaten dann nicht öffentlich, sondern nur per eMail an angemeldete Personen.
* Im "Meeting"-Tab:
1. Aktiviere "Teilnehmer beim Beitritt stumm schalten". Du hast dann bei jedem Meeting die Option, zu entscheiden, ob sich Teilnehmerinnen entstummen dürfen oder ob du das Sprechrecht einzeln vergeben willst.
1. Schalte "Co-Moderator" ein und befördere einer Person, der du vertraust, als Co-Moderator. Diese Person hat dann ebenfalls das Recht, Leute stummzuschalten oder zu kicken, und kann dir arbeit abnehmen.
1. Setze "Bildschirmübertragung" so, dass nur der Host den Bildschirm freigeben darf. Das verhindert, dass Leute ihren Bildschirm freigeben, um "Inhalte" zu präsentieren. Leute, die Vortragen müssen, können zum Co-Moderator befördert werden.
1. Aktiviere "Feedback ohne Worte". Das ist nützlich, damit Leute "die Hand heben können" wenn sie etwas sagen wollen - und dann kannst du als Host sie Entstummschalten und sie können reden.
1. Schalte den "Warteraum" für alle Teilnehmerinnen an, wenn das Gespräch persönlich ist. Das bedeutet, dass alle neuen Teilnehmerinnen in einen virtuellen Warteraum gesetzt werden, und die Moderatoren haben die Möglichkeit, diese Leute dann in das Meeting zu holen. Wenn du diese Option aktivierst, achte darauf, die Teilnehmerliste im Blick zu halten, damit du niemanden übersiehst.
1. Stelle sicher, dass "Entfernten Teilnehmern den erneuten Beitritt erlauben" deaktiviert ist. Das bedeutet, dass Leute, die aus dem Meeting geworfen wurden, nicht wieder beitreten können, auch wenn sie die Zugangsdaten kennen.
#zoom #privacy #security
 
(German translation below.)

If you're stuck at home and use Zoom as a video conferencing solution that works for you, that's fine. Keep using it. Here are some options you might want to check to enhance the overall security of your and your guests.

First, log in at https://zoom.us/signin and head to your settings at https://zoom.us/profile/setting.

* In the "Meeting" tab:
1. Set "Audio Type" to "Computer Audio". This will block people from using their phone to join a meeting - but that's required if you want to use End-to-End encryption all the time. Phones can't do encryption.
1. Make sure "Use Personal Meeting ID (PMI) when scheduling a meeting" is disabled. The PMI is a meeting ID that never changes, so don't use it. It should be disabled by default, but make sure.
1. Enable "Require a password for Personal Meeting ID (PMI)", so people can't join via your PMI even if you accidentally share it.
1. Make sure "Join before host" is disabled. If enabled, people can join your meetings before a host is there - meaning there won't be moderation.
1. Enable "Play sound when participants join or leave". That's useful, as everyone will be aware when someone joins unexpectedly.
1. Enable "Require Encryption for 3rd Party Endpoints (H323/SIP)".
* In the "Recording" tab:
1. Disable "Cloud recording". You can still record meetings to your local disk, but there is no need to store potentially private conversations on Zoom's servers.

If you have a more "presentation"-like format scheduled, where only you or a small number of presenters will be speaking to a high number of consuming participants, there are a couple of additional tips in addition to the settings above:

* Before the meeting: Require people to sign-up and collect their eMail addresses. Do not share the join-link publicly, and only send the credentials via eMail to the people who signed up.
* In the "Meeting" tab:
1. Enable "Mute participants upon entry" - this will force-mute everyone joining. You will have the option to decide whether people can speak or not.
1. Enable "Co-host" and promote someone you trust as Co-host to assist with muting/unmuting people as needed.
1. Set "Screen sharing" to "Host-Only" to avoid random people sharing their screens, which can be used for abuse. Promote people who need to share as Co-hosts, if you trust them.
1. Enable "Nonverbal feedback". This is useful if you have force-muted everyone. People can raise their hands if they want to say something, allowing you to unmute people for a short period.
1. Enable "Waiting room" for all participants if the nature of the call is sensitive/private. This means that people will not be able to join your meeting directly, but will be placed in a virtual waiting room, waiting for you to approve them to join the meeting. If you enable this, make sure to keep an eye on the participant list to avoid missing someone.
1. Make sure "Allow removed participants to rejoin" is disabled. This means that people that got kicked out of the meeting will not be able to rejoin, even if they know the credentials.
Wenn du zuhause festsitzt und Zoom als das Tool deiner Wahl für Videokonferenzen und Videotelefonate entdeckt hast, mach dir nicht zu viel Sorgen und bleibe dabei. Es ist wichtiger, ein Tool zu haben, dass stressfrei und problemlos die Aufgabe erledigt, als sich stundenlang mit Alternativen zu schlagen. Hier sind einige Tipps, wie du deine Meetings für dich und deine Teilnehmerinnen sicherer gestalten kannst.

Als Erstes, melde dich auf https://zoom.us/signin an und rufe deine Einstellungen unter https://zoom.us/profile/setting auf.

* Im "Meeting"-Tab:
1. Setze "Audiotyp" auf "Computeraudio". Damit deaktivierst du zwar die Möglichkeit, über ein Telefon am Meeting teilzunehmen, aber das ist wichtig, wenn du Ende-zu-Ende-Verschlüsselung verwenden willst. Telefone verstehen keine Verschlüsselung.
1. Stelle sicher, dass "Beim Planen eines Meetings die persönliche Meeting-ID (PMI) verwenden" nicht aktiv ist. Deine PMI ist eine Meeting-ID, die sich nie ändert, also sollte man davon besser die Finger lassen.
1. Schalte "Bei Personal-Meeting-ID (PMI) Kennwort verlangen" an, falls man doch mal versehentlich die fixe PMI weitergibt. Mit Kennwort kann dann trotzdem niemand das Meeting betreten.
1. Deaktiviere "Beitritt vor Moderator", dann können deine Gäste das Meeting erst betreten, wenn du da bist. Ist diese Option deaktiviert, können Leute ohne Moderation das Meeting betreten.
1. Aktiviere "Sound wiedergeben, wenn Teilnehmer teilnehmen oder verlassen". Dann wird immer, wenn eine Teilnehmerin beitritt, ein Ton für alle abgespielt. Damit wissen alle, wenn unerwartet jemand dazu kommt.
1. Aktiviere "Verschlüsselung für Endpunkte von Drittanbietern erforderlich (H323/SIP)".
* Im "Aufzeichnung"-Tab:
1. "Cloud-Aufzeichnung" ausschalten. Du kannst das Meeting immernoch auf deine Festplatte aufnehmen, aber es gibt keinen Grund, potenziell private Gespräche auf Zoom's Servern zu speichern.

Wenn man ein "vortragsähliches" Ding geplant hat, also ein Format in dem eine kleine Gruppe an Leuten aktiv zu einer großen, ggf. öffentlichen Gruppe spricht, gibt es zu den Einstellungen oben noch ein paar weitere Tipps:

* Vor dem Meeting: Stelle sicher, dass sich alle Teilnehmerinnen vor der Veranstaltung anmelden und sammle eMail-Adressen. Verteile den Zoom-Link oder die Meetingdaten dann nicht öffentlich, sondern nur per eMail an angemeldete Personen.
* Im "Meeting"-Tab:
1. Aktiviere "Teilnehmer beim Beitritt stumm schalten". Du hast dann bei jedem Meeting die Option, zu entscheiden, ob sich Teilnehmerinnen entstummen dürfen oder ob du das Sprechrecht einzeln vergeben willst.
1. Schalte "Co-Moderator" ein und befördere einer Person, der du vertraust, als Co-Moderator. Diese Person hat dann ebenfalls das Recht, Leute stummzuschalten oder zu kicken, und kann dir arbeit abnehmen.
1. Setze "Bildschirmübertragung" so, dass nur der Host den Bildschirm freigeben darf. Das verhindert, dass Leute ihren Bildschirm freigeben, um "Inhalte" zu präsentieren. Leute, die Vortragen müssen, können zum Co-Moderator befördert werden.
1. Aktiviere "Feedback ohne Worte". Das ist nützlich, damit Leute "die Hand heben können" wenn sie etwas sagen wollen - und dann kannst du als Host sie Entstummschalten und sie können reden.
1. Schalte den "Warteraum" für alle Teilnehmerinnen an, wenn das Gespräch persönlich ist. Das bedeutet, dass alle neuen Teilnehmerinnen in einen virtuellen Warteraum gesetzt werden, und die Moderatoren haben die Möglichkeit, diese Leute dann in das Meeting zu holen. Wenn du diese Option aktivierst, achte darauf, die Teilnehmerliste im Blick zu halten, damit du niemanden übersiehst.
1. Stelle sicher, dass "Entfernten Teilnehmern den erneuten Beitritt erlauben" deaktiviert ist. Das bedeutet, dass Leute, die aus dem Meeting geworfen wurden, nicht wieder beitreten können, auch wenn sie die Zugangsdaten kennen.
#zoom #privacy #security
 

Snowden warns: The surveillance states we’re creating now will outlast the coronavirus


Temporary security measures can soon become permanent

https://thenextweb.com/neural/2020/03/25/snowden-warns-the-surveillance-states-were-creating-now-will-outlast-the-coronavirus/

#coronavirus #covid19 #surveillance #privacy #permanent #snowden
 

Snowden warns: The surveillance states we’re creating now will outlast the coronavirus


Temporary security measures can soon become permanent

https://thenextweb.com/neural/2020/03/25/snowden-warns-the-surveillance-states-were-creating-now-will-outlast-the-coronavirus/

#coronavirus #covid19 #surveillance #privacy #permanent #snowden
 

Bruce Schneier: Emergency Surveillance During COVID-19 Crisis:

[A]ny data collection and digital monitoring of potential carriers of COVID-19 should take into consideration and commit to these principles:
  • Privacy intrusions must be necessary and proportionate. A program that collects, en masse, identifiable information about people must be scientifically justified and deemed necessary by public health experts for the purpose of containment. And that data processing must be proportionate to the need. For example, maintenance of 10 years of travel history of all people would not be proportionate to the need to contain a disease like COVID-19, which has a two-week incubation period.
  • Data collection based on science, not bias. Given the global scope of communicable diseases, there is historical precedent for improper government containment efforts driven by bias based on nationality, ethnicity, religion, and race­ -- rather than facts about a particular individual's actual likelihood of contracting the virus...
  • Expiration. ... The government and its corporate cooperators must roll back any invasive programs created in the name of public health after crisis has been contained.
  • Transparency. Any government use of \"big data\" to track virus spread must be clearly and quickly explained to the public....
  • Due Process. If the government seeks to limit a person's rights based on this \"big data\" surveillance ... then the person must have the opportunity to timely and fairly challenge these conclusions and limits.
Abridged from original, well worth reading in full.

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/03/emergency_surve.html

#covid19 #privacy #surveillance #surveillanceState #surveillanceCapitalism #BruceSchneier
 

Bruce Schneier: Emergency Surveillance During COVID-19 Crisis:

[A]ny data collection and digital monitoring of potential carriers of COVID-19 should take into consideration and commit to these principles:
  • Privacy intrusions must be necessary and proportionate. A program that collects, en masse, identifiable information about people must be scientifically justified and deemed necessary by public health experts for the purpose of containment. And that data processing must be proportionate to the need. For example, maintenance of 10 years of travel history of all people would not be proportionate to the need to contain a disease like COVID-19, which has a two-week incubation period.
  • Data collection based on science, not bias. Given the global scope of communicable diseases, there is historical precedent for improper government containment efforts driven by bias based on nationality, ethnicity, religion, and race­ -- rather than facts about a particular individual's actual likelihood of contracting the virus...
  • Expiration. ... The government and its corporate cooperators must roll back any invasive programs created in the name of public health after crisis has been contained.
  • Transparency. Any government use of \"big data\" to track virus spread must be clearly and quickly explained to the public....
  • Due Process. If the government seeks to limit a person's rights based on this \"big data\" surveillance ... then the person must have the opportunity to timely and fairly challenge these conclusions and limits.
Abridged from original, well worth reading in full.

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2020/03/emergency_surve.html

#covid19 #privacy #surveillance #surveillanceState #surveillanceCapitalism #BruceSchneier
 

For years, @Google used flutrends as a justification for their retention policies for search arguing that the social benefit from 'big data' offsets the privacy invasions.

Which was later mostly disproved...

As the pandemic gets worse, we're going to see increased pressure by all governments to access #private consumer data to identify:

1) who is infected \
2) who they've been in contact with ("contact tracing")

This is going to be an incredibly slippery slope if we're not careful.
https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1240320586535931906.html

#covid19 #coronavirus #privacy #Google #surveillanceCapitalis #surveillanceState
 

For years, @Google used flutrends as a justification for their retention policies for search arguing that the social benefit from 'big data' offsets the privacy invasions.

Which was later mostly disproved...

As the pandemic gets worse, we're going to see increased pressure by all governments to access #private consumer data to identify:

1) who is infected \
2) who they've been in contact with ("contact tracing")

This is going to be an incredibly slippery slope if we're not careful.
https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1240320586535931906.html

#covid19 #coronavirus #privacy #Google #surveillanceCapitalis #surveillanceState
 
Bild/Foto

Private WhatsApp groups visible in Google searches

Your #WhatsApp groups may not be as secure as you think they are


Google is indexing invite links to private WhatsApp group chats. This means with a simple search anyone can discover and join these groups including ones the administrator may want to keep private.

Does #Google care about your privacy and security? No.

Does #Facebook honestly care about your privacy and security? No.

https://www.dw.com/en/private-whatsapp-groups-visible-in-google-searches/a-52468603

#Facebook #chat #apps #privacy #security #surveillance #messaging #im
 
Bild/Foto

Private WhatsApp groups visible in Google searches

Your #WhatsApp groups may not be as secure as you think they are


Google is indexing invite links to private WhatsApp group chats. This means with a simple search anyone can discover and join these groups including ones the administrator may want to keep private.

Does #Google care about your privacy and security? No.

Does #Facebook honestly care about your privacy and security? No.

https://www.dw.com/en/private-whatsapp-groups-visible-in-google-searches/a-52468603

#Facebook #chat #apps #privacy #security #surveillance #messaging #im
 
Bild/Foto

Private WhatsApp groups visible in Google searches

Your #WhatsApp groups may not be as secure as you think they are


Google is indexing invite links to private WhatsApp group chats. This means with a simple search anyone can discover and join these groups including ones the administrator may want to keep private.

Does #Google care about your privacy and security? No.

Does #Facebook honestly care about your privacy and security? No.

https://www.dw.com/en/private-whatsapp-groups-visible-in-google-searches/a-52468603

#Facebook #chat #apps #privacy #security #surveillance #messaging #im
 
Why Amazon Knows So Much About You

…One database contains transcriptions of all 31,082 interactions my family has had with the virtual assistant Alexa. Audio clips of the recordings are also provided. The 48 requests to play Let It Go, flag my daughter’s infatuation with Disney’s Frozen.
Other late-night music requests to the bedroom Echo, might provide a clue to a more adult activity…

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/extra/CLQYZENMBI/amazon-data

#amazon #surveillanceCapitalism #dataAreLiability #privacy #bbc
 
Why Amazon Knows So Much About You

…One database contains transcriptions of all 31,082 interactions my family has had with the virtual assistant Alexa. Audio clips of the recordings are also provided. The 48 requests to play Let It Go, flag my daughter’s infatuation with Disney’s Frozen.
Other late-night music requests to the bedroom Echo, might provide a clue to a more adult activity…

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/extra/CLQYZENMBI/amazon-data

#amazon #surveillanceCapitalism #dataAreLiability #privacy #bbc
 

SHA-1 is a Shambles

First Chosen-Prefix Collision on SHA-1 and Application to the PGP Web of Trust


https://eprint.iacr.org/2020/014.pdf

Below is the abstract from the article. The most concerning thing here is the ability to forge signatures of keys. As you know if you read my posts, I have always argued that we should never sign other people's keys. Even without the problem of possible forged signatures using the technique in the article, key-signing harms privacy.

The only key signature created by EasyGPG is the signature on a newly created key pair.

printf "${newkeyattr}" | env TZ=UTC gpg --homedir "${keydir}" --batch --use-agent --cert-digest-algo "SHA512" --s2k-cipher-algo "AES256" --s2k-digest-algo "SHA512" --s2k-mode 3 --s2k-count 32000000 --status-file "${temp}" --gen-key 2> /dev/null

Notice that SHA512 is used. As for signatures on messages and encrypted files, see below (after the abstract). EasyGPG always uses SHA512.

Abstract. The SHA-1 hash function was designed in 1995 and has been widely used
during two decades. A theoretical collision attack was first proposed in 2004 [WYY05],
but due to its high complexity it was only implemented in practice in 2017, using
a large GPU cluster [SBK + 17]. More recently, an almost practical chosen-prefix
collision attack against SHA-1 has been proposed [LP19]. This more powerful attack
allows to build colliding messages with two arbitrary prefixes, which is much more
threatening for real protocols.
In this paper, we report the first practical implementation of this attack, and its
impact on real-world security with a PGP/GnuPG impersonation attack. We managed
to significantly reduce the complexity of collisions attack against SHA-1: on an Nvidia
GTX 970, identical-prefix collisions can now be computed with a complexity of 2 61.2
rather than 2 64.7 , and chosen-prefix collisions with a complexity of 2 63.4 rather than
2 67.1 . When renting cheap GPUs, this translates to a cost of 11k US$ for a collision,
and 45k US$ for a chosen-prefix collision, within the means of academic researchers.
Our actual attack required two months of computations using 900 Nvidia GTX 1060
GPUs (we paid 75k US$ because GPU prices were higher, and we wasted some time
preparing the attack).
Therefore, the same attacks that have been practical on MD5 since 2009 are now
practical on SHA-1. In particular, chosen-prefix collisions can break signature schemes
and handshake security in secure channel protocols (TLS, SSH). We strongly advise
to remove SHA-1 from those type of applications as soon as possible.
We exemplify our cryptanalysis by creating a pair of PGP/GnuPG keys with different
identities, but colliding SHA-1 certificates. A SHA-1 certification of the first key can
therefore be transferred to the second key, leading to a forgery. This proves that
SHA-1 signatures now offers virtually no security in practice. The legacy branch of
GnuPG still uses SHA-1 by default for identity certifications, but after notifying the
authors, the modern branch now rejects SHA-1 signatures (the issue is tracked as
CVE-2019-14855).
Keywords:
$ grep "gpg" easygpg.sh | grep " -s " 
  encryptedText=`printf "%s\n" "${theText}" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always --textmode -s -u "${senderID}" -e ${recipients} --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty -` 
  printf "%s\n" "${theText}" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always --textmode -s -u "${senderID}" --no-emit-version --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty - | xclip -i -selection clipboard 
      (tar --numeric-owner -c "$(basename "${filename}")" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" --trust-model always -a -s -u "${senderID}" -e ${recipients} --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty --yes -o "${savepath}" -) | zenity --progress --text="Encrypting..." --pulsate --auto-close --no-cancel 
      (tar --numeric-owner -c "$(basename "${filename}")" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" --trust-model always -s -u "${senderID}" -e ${recipients} --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty --yes -o "${savepath}" -) | zenity --progress --text="Encrypting..." --pulsate --auto-close --no-cancel 
    tar --numeric-owner -c "$(basename "${filename}")" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always -s -u "${senderID}" --no-emit-version --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty --yes -o "${savepath}" - 
    printf "%s\n" "${theText}" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always --textmode -s -u "${senderID}" -e -R "${senderID}" --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty - > "${savepath}" 
    printf "%s\n" "${theText}" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always --textmode -s -u "${senderID}" -e -R "${senderID}" --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty - > "${savepath}"

#easygpg #gpg #encryption #privacy #surveillance #security #cryptography
 

SHA-1 is a Shambles

First Chosen-Prefix Collision on SHA-1 and Application to the PGP Web of Trust


https://eprint.iacr.org/2020/014.pdf

Below is the abstract from the article. The most concerning thing here is the ability to forge signatures of keys. As you know if you read my posts, I have always argued that we should never sign other people's keys. Even without the problem of possible forged signatures using the technique in the article, key-signing harms privacy.

The only key signature created by EasyGPG is the signature on a newly created key pair.

printf "${newkeyattr}" | env TZ=UTC gpg --homedir "${keydir}" --batch --use-agent --cert-digest-algo "SHA512" --s2k-cipher-algo "AES256" --s2k-digest-algo "SHA512" --s2k-mode 3 --s2k-count 32000000 --status-file "${temp}" --gen-key 2> /dev/null

Notice that SHA512 is used. As for signatures on messages and encrypted files, see below (after the abstract). EasyGPG always uses SHA512.

Abstract. The SHA-1 hash function was designed in 1995 and has been widely used
during two decades. A theoretical collision attack was first proposed in 2004 [WYY05],
but due to its high complexity it was only implemented in practice in 2017, using
a large GPU cluster [SBK + 17]. More recently, an almost practical chosen-prefix
collision attack against SHA-1 has been proposed [LP19]. This more powerful attack
allows to build colliding messages with two arbitrary prefixes, which is much more
threatening for real protocols.
In this paper, we report the first practical implementation of this attack, and its
impact on real-world security with a PGP/GnuPG impersonation attack. We managed
to significantly reduce the complexity of collisions attack against SHA-1: on an Nvidia
GTX 970, identical-prefix collisions can now be computed with a complexity of 2 61.2
rather than 2 64.7 , and chosen-prefix collisions with a complexity of 2 63.4 rather than
2 67.1 . When renting cheap GPUs, this translates to a cost of 11k US$ for a collision,
and 45k US$ for a chosen-prefix collision, within the means of academic researchers.
Our actual attack required two months of computations using 900 Nvidia GTX 1060
GPUs (we paid 75k US$ because GPU prices were higher, and we wasted some time
preparing the attack).
Therefore, the same attacks that have been practical on MD5 since 2009 are now
practical on SHA-1. In particular, chosen-prefix collisions can break signature schemes
and handshake security in secure channel protocols (TLS, SSH). We strongly advise
to remove SHA-1 from those type of applications as soon as possible.
We exemplify our cryptanalysis by creating a pair of PGP/GnuPG keys with different
identities, but colliding SHA-1 certificates. A SHA-1 certification of the first key can
therefore be transferred to the second key, leading to a forgery. This proves that
SHA-1 signatures now offers virtually no security in practice. The legacy branch of
GnuPG still uses SHA-1 by default for identity certifications, but after notifying the
authors, the modern branch now rejects SHA-1 signatures (the issue is tracked as
CVE-2019-14855).
Keywords:
$ grep "gpg" easygpg.sh | grep " -s " 
  encryptedText=`printf "%s\n" "${theText}" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always --textmode -s -u "${senderID}" -e ${recipients} --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty -` 
  printf "%s\n" "${theText}" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always --textmode -s -u "${senderID}" --no-emit-version --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty - | xclip -i -selection clipboard 
      (tar --numeric-owner -c "$(basename "${filename}")" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" --trust-model always -a -s -u "${senderID}" -e ${recipients} --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty --yes -o "${savepath}" -) | zenity --progress --text="Encrypting..." --pulsate --auto-close --no-cancel 
      (tar --numeric-owner -c "$(basename "${filename}")" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" --trust-model always -s -u "${senderID}" -e ${recipients} --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty --yes -o "${savepath}" -) | zenity --progress --text="Encrypting..." --pulsate --auto-close --no-cancel 
    tar --numeric-owner -c "$(basename "${filename}")" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always -s -u "${senderID}" --no-emit-version --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty --yes -o "${savepath}" - 
    printf "%s\n" "${theText}" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always --textmode -s -u "${senderID}" -e -R "${senderID}" --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty - > "${savepath}" 
    printf "%s\n" "${theText}" | gpg --homedir "${keydir}" -a --trust-model always --textmode -s -u "${senderID}" -e -R "${senderID}" --no-emit-version --no-encrypt-to --personal-digest-preferences "SHA512 SHA384 SHA256" --personal-compress-preferences "ZLIB BZIP2 ZIP" --personal-cipher-preferences "AES256 TWOFISH CAMELLIA256 AES192 AES" --use-agent --no-tty - > "${savepath}"

#easygpg #gpg #encryption #privacy #surveillance #security #cryptography
 
An die Adressen milieuinterner Konkurrenten, potenzieller Opfer oder behördlicher Gegner kommen Clan-Männer mitunter, ohne dass sie über Spitzel in der Polizei verfügen müssen. Milieukenner berichten, dass sich in den Großfamilien meist ein Cousin, eine Nichte oder ein Onkel findet, der bei einem Mobilfunkanbieter, einer Autovermietung oder einer Hausverwaltung arbeitet. Da hierzulande fast jeder in einer solchen Datei registriert ist, können zu Namen entsprechende Anschriften gefunden werden.
#datenschutz #privacy #polizei #kriminalität #omeirat-clan #tagesspiegel #mobilfunk
 
Intersting, an open letter to Google against pre-installed application in Android:

https://privacyinternational.org/advocacy/3320/open-letter-google

#android #google #privacy #tracking
 
Intersting, an open letter to Google against pre-installed application in Android:

https://privacyinternational.org/advocacy/3320/open-letter-google

#android #google #privacy #tracking
 
Oh look, I just published my retrospective of social media (and the internet) in the 2010s. It's a bit ranty, and a bit negative, but I needed to write that.

The 2010s and alternative Social Media: A decade full of work, hope, and disappointment
https://schub.wtf/blog/2020/01/01/2010s-alternative-social-media.html

(caution, ~3500 words)
#diaspora #privacy #socialmedia #standards and stuff
 
Oh look, I just published my retrospective of social media (and the internet) in the 2010s. It's a bit ranty, and a bit negative, but I needed to write that.

The 2010s and alternative Social Media: A decade full of work, hope, and disappointment
https://schub.wtf/blog/2020/01/01/2010s-alternative-social-media.html

(caution, ~3500 words)
#diaspora #privacy #socialmedia #standards and stuff
 
Es ist wahrscheinlich, das dieser Artikel in meiner Filterblase sowieso schon aufgefallen ist. Ich möchte in dennoch teilen.

#smartphone #kinder #Einrichtung #privacy #medienkomeptenz

Kommentar: Android-Smartphone kinder- und jugendfreundlich einrichten

1. MedienkompetenzSmartphone-Kind


Mit dem Beginn der Schule stehen viele Eltern vor der Entscheidung, ob ihr Nachwuchs ein Smartphone bekommen soll. Mit dieser Entscheidung sind allerdings viele Fragen, Überlegungen und Fallstricke verbunden, mit denen man sich vor der Anschaffung beschäftigen sollte. Tippen und Wischen kann jedes Kind – auch jeder Erwachsene. Die entscheidende Frage ist vielmehr, wie kann der Umgang mit einem Smartphone möglichst kinder- und jugendfreundlich gestaltet werden?

Die Antwort auf diese Frage ist erschreckend einfach, aber zugleich auch unheimlich schwierig in der praktischen Umsetzung. Sie lautet: Medienkompetenz:
Medienkompetenz bezeichnet die Fähigkeit, Medien und ihre Inhalte den eigenen Zielen und Bedürfnissen entsprechend sachkundig zu nutzen.

Was sich trivial anhört, ist im Grunde genommen eine der wichtigsten Eigenschaften, die Eltern ihren Kindern vermitteln sollten. Diese Eigenschaft ist heute essenziell und so grundlegend, weil sie Menschen nicht nur befähigt Medien wie Bücher, Zeitschriften, Fernseher, Internet usw. nutzen zu können, sondern ebenso dazu beiträgt, eine kritische bzw. gesunde Distanz zu Medien zu halten.

Wir sind praktisch ständig von den unterschiedlichsten Medien umgeben, was zu einer Art Dauerbeschallung und endloser Informationsflut führt. Dabei nimmt das Smartphone eine besondere Rolle ein, da es die unterschiedlichsten Medien vereint und einen praktisch unendlichen Medienkonsum ermöglicht. Ohne klare Regeln, Apps, die dabei helfen diese einzuhalten und vor allem der Vermittlung von Medienkompetenz, sind Kinder in dieser Informationswelt verloren. Es ist unsere Aufgabe als Eltern hier einzuwirken.

2. Ab welchem Alter?


Bevor ein Smartphone für den Nachwuchs angeschafft wird, sollte man sich zunächst einmal erkundigen, ab welchem Alter die Nutzung überhaupt empfohlen ist bzw. grundlegender, ob das eigene Kind eigentlich schon reif für ein Smartphone ist. Die EU-Initiative für mehr Sicherheit im Netz – klicksafe.de sagt:
Ein voll funktionsfähiges Smartphone ist somit für Kinder unter 12 Jahren eher nicht geeignet.

Die Diplom-Pädagogin Kristin Langer sagt in einem Spiegel-Interview:
Der Elternratgeber „Schau hin!“ empfiehlt ein Smartphone ab elf oder zwölf Jahren. Dann sind Kinder in der Regel emotional so gefestigt, dass sie sagen können: Ich will mir kein Video anschauen, in dem jemand gefoltert wird, auch wenn meine Klassenkameraden sich das angucken.

Auch in weiteren Quellen wird oftmals ein Alter um die 12 Jahre genannt. Und seien wir realistisch: Länger lässt es sich leider vermutlich gar nicht mehr »hinauszögern«, da Kinder sich sonst ausgegrenzt fühlen und eventuell auch zum Außenseiter werden, da über 60% der 12- bis 13-Jährigen bereits ein Smartphone haben. Dennoch gibt es auch kritische Stimmen wie den Hirnforscher Manfred Spitzer, die
Smartphones ohne Aufsicht erst ab 18 Jahren

empfehlen. Letztendlich muss diese Entscheidung jeder für sich selbst treffen. Persönlich würde ich unserer Tochter unter 12 Jahren jedenfalls auch kein eigenes Smartphone überlassen.

3. Klare Regeln kommunizieren | Medienkompetenz vermitteln


Sofern das Kind reif genug ist bzw. man sich zum Kauf eines Smartphones entschieden hat, steht sogleich die Frage im Raum, wie man als Eltern damit nun umgeht. Für das familiäre Zusammenleben halte ich es zunächst für essenziell ein paar klare Regeln aufzustellen:
  • Kein Smartphone am Esstisch bzw. beim Essen
  • Keine zwei Bildschirme parallel. Also bspw. entweder Fernseher ODER Smartphone
  • Beim Verbringen von gemeinsamer Zeit (bspw. Brettspiel) kein Smartphone
  • Bei Gesprächen mit anderen Personen Smartphone komplett weglegen
  • Bei Hausaufgaben Smartphone ausschalten
  • Vor dem Zubettgehen Smartphone ausschalten
  • […]

Das sind zunächst einmal nur Verhaltensregeln. Grundsätzlich gilt: Kinder bzw. Jugendliche sind neugierig und werden versuchen alles mögliche zu sehen bzw. mit dem Smartphone auszuprobieren – auch Dinge, die definitiv nicht für Kinder geeignet sind. Daher sollte man das Smartphone bzw. die unendlichen Weiten des Internets gemeinsam mit den Kindern entdecken und dem Kind klar kommunizieren:
Wenn du etwas siehst oder hörst, was du nicht einordnen kannst, dann kannst du damit jederzeit zu mir kommen und wir schauen es uns gemeinsam an. Ich werde dir das Smartphone nicht wegnehmen.

Der Hintergrund ist ganz einfach: Irgendwann werden Kinder und ganz besonders Jugendliche auf Pornos, Gewaltvideos und dergleichen stoßen. Aus Angst, ihnen könnte das Smartphone weggenommen werden, gehen sie mit verstörenden Inhalten allerdings oftmals nicht zu ihren Eltern. Es ist daher besonders wichtig, dem Kind zu vermitteln, dass es sich jederzeit vertrauensvoll an die Eltern wenden kann, ohne Gefahr zu laufen, das Smartphone entzogen zu bekommen. Das Ziel sollte sein, dem Kind Medienkompetenz zu vermitteln – das kann aber nur dann gelingen, wenn man sich als Eltern dafür Zeit nimmt und dies auf Augenhöhe stattfindet.

4. Android kinder- und jugendfreundlich einrichten


Klare Regeln und sich Zeit zu nehmen sind allerdings nur die halbe Miete. Die Frage, die wohl die meisten Eltern beschäftigt, ist folgende: Wie kann ein Android Smartphone / Tablet kindersicher eingerichtet werden? Nach meiner Auffassung ist die beste Variante: Gemeinsam mit dem Kind das Smartphone erkunden und Inhalte, Apps usw. konsumieren bzw. hinterfragen. Es gibt zwar diverse Apps, mit denen sich eine Art Kindersicherung einrichten lässt – allerdings sind die meisten Apps aus diesem Bereich wenig datenschutzfreundlich und viele Informationen landen bei den App-Herstellern. Zudem kommen viele Funktionen einer Überwachung (bspw. Gerät orten) gleich, was nach meiner Auffassung eine Verletzung der Privatsphäre darstellt. Die Plattform mobilsicher.de hat einige Kindersicherungs-Apps einem Test unterzogen. Die Redaktion fand letztendlich lediglich die App JoLo empfehlenswert. Zitat:
Die Funktionen sind durchdacht, ohne übergriffig zu sein: So können Eltern zwar per Fernzugriff sehen, wie viel Nutzungszeit insgesamt aus jeder Kategorie verbraucht wurde, aber nicht, welche App das Kind wann und wie lange nutzt.

[…]

Die App ist gut geeignet, um vorher gemeinsam getroffene Absprachen durchzusetzen. Wir raten dringend davon ab, diese (oder jede andere App dieser Art) ohne Absprache und regelmäßige Gespräche mit dem Kind zu nutzen.

Erfreulich: Den Preis für die App bezahlt man mit Geld und nicht mit den Daten seiner Kinder. Wir sagen: Hier gibt es nichts zu meckern – bitte mehr davon!

Abgesehen vom Thema Medienkompetenz spielt natürlich auch das Thema Datenschutz bzw. Privatsphäre bei der Nutzung eines Android-Smartphones eine wichtige Rolle. Google Android-Smartphones sind grundsätzlich für die Datensammlung ausgelegt. Fast jede App aus dem Google Play Store hat diverse Tracker integriert, die das Nutzungsverhalten analysieren, Werbung einblenden und damit insgesamt wenig datenschutzfreundlich sind. Da Kinder und Jugendlich allgemein allerdings sehr neugierig sind und alle erdenklichen Apps ausprobieren möchten, steht die Frage im Raum, wie man damit umgehen sollte. Eine mögliche Lösung möchte ich kurz skizzieren:
  • Innerhalb der Familie gibt es ein sog. »Datenschleuder-Smartphone«, das mit allen erdenklichen Apps und Inhalten bespielt werden darf. Dabei gelten folgende Regeln:
    • Die Nutzung erfolgt immer unter Aufsicht eines Erwachsenen – die Förderung der Medienkompetenz bitte stets im Hinterkopf behalten.
    • Es werden keine personenbezogenen Daten hinterlegt bzw. eingegeben, sondern mit »Fake-Profilen« bzw. falschen Angaben gearbeitet.
  • Daneben existiert noch ein weiteres Gerät, das dem Kind / Jugendlichen gehört. Dafür gelten klare Regeln, es ist bestenfalls »entgoogelt« oder zumindest mit Blokada vor den Datensammlern geschützt. Mit der Kindersicherungs-App JoLo kann man die gemeinsam getroffenen Absprachen zur Nutzungsdauer etc. »durchsetzen«. Aber auch hier gilt: Eltern sollten die Apps gemeinsam mit den Kindern installieren, möglichst viele Inhalte gemeinsam erkunden und eine vertrauensvolle Beziehung in den Vordergrund stellen.

5. Weitere Fragen bzw. Informationen


Als Eltern beschäftigen euch sicherlich noch weitere Fragen wie:
  • Was ist beim Umgang mit sozialen Netzwerken zu beachten?
  • Ist mein Kind Smartphone süchtig?
  • Mein Kind konnte jahrelang mit Handy und Computer machen was es wollte. Wie kann ich das jetzt einschränken und in vernünftige Bahnen lenken?
  • Mein Kind ist Cyber-Mobbing ausgesetzt – was ist das bzw. was kann ich tun?
  • Smartphone ohne Ende? Klare Medienzeiten vereinbaren.
  • […]

Antworten, hilfreiche Tipps, Leitfäden, App-Reviews etc. findet ihr auf den folgenden Seiten:

6. Fazit


Die Vermittlung von Medienkompetenz an unseren Nachwuchs ist im Grunde genommen eine gesamtgesellschaftliche Aufgabe. Den meisten Einfluss auf eine Ausbildung der Medienkompetenz haben dabei vermutlich die schulische Umgebung, Freunde und nicht zuletzt die Eltern, denen hier eine besondere Verantwortung zukommt. Eltern sollten ihren Kindern nicht nur Medienkompetenz vermitteln, sondern ebenfalls mit gutem Beispiel vorangehen und die aufgestellten Regeln im Haushalt ebenso berücksichtigen – liebe Eltern, ihr seid keine Snombies!

Zum Abschluss bzw. als Ergänzung zu diesem Kommentar wäre es interessant zu erfahren, welche Erfahrungen ihr als Eltern mit dem Thema Smartphone bereits sammeln konntet. Nutzt dafür gerne die Kommentarfunktion.

Bildquellen:

Girl: Freepik from www.flaticon.com is licensed by CC 3.0 BY

Mitmachen: Der Kuketz-Blog ist spendenfinanziert!
https://www.kuketz-blog.de/kommentar-android-smartphone-kinder-und-jugendfreundlich-einrichten/
Europa 

Bad news: 'Unblockable' web trackers emerge. Good news: Firefox with uBlock Origin can stop it. Chrome, not so much • The Register


Why #adblocking is personal defense!
#tracking #privacy
 
Sehr schöner Artikel. Ein Selbstversuch von Nicht Technikern.

#Datenschutz #Selbstversuch #c3w #privacy


https://fm4.orf.at/stories/2993316/
Europa 
Moin #Nerds ;)
Ich versuche grade mein #samsung s5 mini mit ner #CustomRom zu bespielen (vermutlich nen innofizielle Build von #Lineageos) und habe irgendwie #Probleme #TWRP aufzuspielen.
USB-Debug ist aktiviert, #adb erkennt das Handy im normalen Modus, aber nicht im Donloadmodus, #heimdall zeigt ne Device an im Downloadmodus, wenn ich aber TWRP draufflashen will, bekomm ich (verschiedene) Fehlermeldungen, dass keine Verbindung zum Handy aufgebaut werden kann. Hat jemand ne Idee, was das Problem sein könnte?
#privacy
 
Moin #Nerds ;)
Ich versuche grade mein #samsung s5 mini mit ner #CustomRom zu bespielen (vermutlich nen innofizielle Build von #Lineageos) und habe irgendwie #Probleme #TWRP aufzuspielen.
USB-Debug ist aktiviert, #adb erkennt das Handy im normalen Modus, aber nicht im Donloadmodus, #heimdall zeigt ne Device an im Downloadmodus, wenn ich aber TWRP draufflashen will, bekomm ich (verschiedene) Fehlermeldungen, dass keine Verbindung zum Handy aufgebaut werden kann. Hat jemand ne Idee, was das Problem sein könnte?
#privacy
 
 
Überwachungsfirma FinFisher geht mit Anwälten gegen unsere kritische Berichterstattung vor




#Netzpolitik #FinFisher #Überwachung #Surveillance #Security #Privacy #Internet
Überwachungsfirma FinFisher geht mit Anwälten gegen unsere kritische Berichterstattung vor
 
Überwachungsfirma FinFisher geht mit Anwälten gegen unsere kritische Berichterstattung vor




#Netzpolitik #FinFisher #Überwachung #Surveillance #Security #Privacy #Internet
Überwachungsfirma FinFisher geht mit Anwälten gegen unsere kritische Berichterstattung vor
 
I do not use WhatsApp, for what it's worth, nor any other software owned or operated by Facebook. (I recommend Signal instead of WhatsApp.)

Facebook, WhatsApp Will Have to Share Messages With U.K. Police

"Social media platforms based in the U.S. including Facebook and WhatsApp will be forced to share users’ encrypted messages with British police under a new treaty between the two countries, according to a person familiar with the matter."

"The accord, which is set to be signed by next month, will compel social media firms to share information to support investigations into individuals suspected of serious criminal offenses including terrorism and pedophilia, the person said."

#Facebook #WhatsApp #surveillance #privacy
 
I do not use WhatsApp, for what it's worth, nor any other software owned or operated by Facebook. (I recommend Signal instead of WhatsApp.)

Facebook, WhatsApp Will Have to Share Messages With U.K. Police

"Social media platforms based in the U.S. including Facebook and WhatsApp will be forced to share users’ encrypted messages with British police under a new treaty between the two countries, according to a person familiar with the matter."

"The accord, which is set to be signed by next month, will compel social media firms to share information to support investigations into individuals suspected of serious criminal offenses including terrorism and pedophilia, the person said."

#Facebook #WhatsApp #surveillance #privacy
 
Later posts Earlier posts