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World of Engineering auf Twitter: "Bosch vs Metabo 😃 📱https://t.co/lJ1POmfSVD https://t.co/V8eWKXQEow" / Twitter


Lol!
#humor
#engineering

https://twitter.com/engineers_feed/status/1334153913776414721
 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #engineering, #marine, and #ship.
 
My friend Peter sent me a link to an article/about his former colleague at Christie Digital Systems in Kitchener, Ontario. The colleague and his team at Hacksmith Industries have designed and built a real, working plasma lightsaber. The video showing the process is absolutely fascinating to watch. Very, very cool indeed.

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-wednesday-edition-1.5762110/canadian-youtubers-engineer-hyper-realistic-plasma-lightsaber-that-can-cut-through-steel-1.5762115

#lightsaber #engineering #creativity #HacksmithIndustries
 

Nima 🌎 auf Twitter: "The best use of drones that I’ve seen so far #engineering #drone #dronesforgood https://t.co/6LBGU41W76" / Twitter


If the drone can do it autonomously, then it will be really useful!

https://twitter.com/NimaRoohiS/status/1309322490376859653
 
[bookmark=https://twitter.com/IntEngineering/status/1271570473621618688]This inside-out planter eliminates the need for soil. 🌿

🎥 @terraplanter
#engineering

[/bookmark]
 

Building the Perfect Squirrel Proof Bird Feeder - YouTube


#squirrels #Engineering

 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #art and #engineering.
 

#engineering
 
 
Bild/Foto

Freeman John Dyson... R.I.P., the Free Man

15 December 1923 – 28 February 2020

Freeman John Dyson was an English-born American theoretical physicist and mathematician known for his work in quantum electrodynamics, solid-state physics, astronomy and nuclear engineering. He was professor emeritus in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, a member of the Board of Visitors of Ralston College and a member of the Board of Sponsors of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.

Dyson originated several concepts that bear his name, such as Dyson's transform, a fundamental technique in additive number theory, which he developed as part of his proof of Mann's theorem; the Dyson tree, a hypothetical genetically-engineered plant capable of growing in a comet; the Dyson series, a perturbative series where each term is represented by Feynman diagrams; the Dyson sphere, a thought experiment that attempts to explain how a space-faring civilization would meet its energy requirements with a hypothetical megastructure that completely encompasses a star and captures a large percentage of its power output; and Dyson's eternal intelligence, a means by which an immortal society of intelligent beings in an open universe could escape the prospect of the heat death of the universe by extending subjective time to infinity while expending only a finite amount of energy.

Dyson believed global warming is caused by increased carbon dioxide through burning fossil fuels but that some of the effects of this are favourable and not taken into account by climate scientists, such as increased agricultural yield. He was skeptical about the simulation models used to predict climate change, arguing that political efforts to reduce causes of climate change distract from other global problems that should take priority.

Dyson died after a fall, at a hospital near Princeton, New Jersey, on 28 February 2020 at age 96.
MORE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freeman_Dyson

Concepts
  • Biotechnology and genetic engineering
  • The Origin of Life
  • Dyson sphere
  • Dyson tree
  • Space colonies
  • Space exploration
  • Dyson's eternal intelligence
  • Dyson's transform
  • Dyson series
  • Quantum physics and prime numbers
  • Rank of a partition
  • Crank of a partition
  • Astrochicken
Photo: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license

#Dyson #biotechnology #genetic #engineering #intelligence #quantum #physics #mathematic #electrodynamics #solid-state #astronom #nuclear #engineering #RIP #news #photo #USA #climate #change #science
 
Bild/Foto

Freeman John Dyson... R.I.P., the Free Man

15 December 1923 – 28 February 2020

Freeman John Dyson was an English-born American theoretical physicist and mathematician known for his work in quantum electrodynamics, solid-state physics, astronomy and nuclear engineering. He was professor emeritus in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, a member of the Board of Visitors of Ralston College and a member of the Board of Sponsors of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.

Dyson originated several concepts that bear his name, such as Dyson's transform, a fundamental technique in additive number theory, which he developed as part of his proof of Mann's theorem; the Dyson tree, a hypothetical genetically-engineered plant capable of growing in a comet; the Dyson series, a perturbative series where each term is represented by Feynman diagrams; the Dyson sphere, a thought experiment that attempts to explain how a space-faring civilization would meet its energy requirements with a hypothetical megastructure that completely encompasses a star and captures a large percentage of its power output; and Dyson's eternal intelligence, a means by which an immortal society of intelligent beings in an open universe could escape the prospect of the heat death of the universe by extending subjective time to infinity while expending only a finite amount of energy.

Dyson believed global warming is caused by increased carbon dioxide through burning fossil fuels but that some of the effects of this are favourable and not taken into account by climate scientists, such as increased agricultural yield. He was skeptical about the simulation models used to predict climate change, arguing that political efforts to reduce causes of climate change distract from other global problems that should take priority.

Dyson died after a fall, at a hospital near Princeton, New Jersey, on 28 February 2020 at age 96.
MORE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freeman_Dyson

Concepts
  • Biotechnology and genetic engineering
  • The Origin of Life
  • Dyson sphere
  • Dyson tree
  • Space colonies
  • Space exploration
  • Dyson's eternal intelligence
  • Dyson's transform
  • Dyson series
  • Quantum physics and prime numbers
  • Rank of a partition
  • Crank of a partition
  • Astrochicken
Photo: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license

#Dyson #biotechnology #genetic #engineering #intelligence #quantum #physics #mathematic #electrodynamics #solid-state #astronom #nuclear #engineering #RIP #news #photo #USA #climate #change #science
 
No, the world’s only healthiest McDonalds
 

Anyone else thinks hackatons are a terrible idea?


A group of programmers in my country ( #czech ) decided they'll create #software for #government for free during 48 hours, for free. While that seems cool at first, I think that is in fact a very #bad idea. Why?

Well imagine you want to do the same e.g. with a building. To save the architect's time and money on his salary you tell him to design the building in one hour as best as he can. While you'll immediately save money, the result will likely be a building that's badly designed, will have many issues you'll be paying for during the next decades.

Hackatons, gaming jams etc. are extremely popular because they look cool and save time, but they create terrible results and teach very bad practice, which is driven by today's short-sighted society. The whole history of #engineering taught us that haste makes waste, but nowadays we're abandoning all sanity because of #capitalism, #markets and #consumerism. The result of course is huge #bloat, ugly, wasteful, obscure, unmaintainable, buggy and even dangerous technology. Let's not do this.

#hackaton #programming #game #jam #suckless #escapekeysociety
 

Anyone else thinks hackatons are a terrible idea?


A group of programmers in my country ( #czech ) decided they'll create #software for #government for free during 48 hours, for free. While that seems cool at first, I think that is in fact a very #bad idea. Why?

Well imagine you want to do the same e.g. with a building. To save the architect's time and money on his salary you tell him to design the building in one hour as best as he can. While you'll immediately save money, the result will likely be a building that's badly designed, will have many issues you'll be paying for during the next decades.

Hackatons, gaming jams etc. are extremely popular because they look cool and save time, but they create terrible results and teach very bad practice, which is driven by today's short-sighted society. The whole history of #engineering taught us that haste makes waste, but nowadays we're abandoning all sanity because of #capitalism, #markets and #consumerism. The result of course is huge #bloat, ugly, wasteful, obscure, unmaintainable, buggy and even dangerous technology. Let's not do this.

#hackaton #programming #game #jam #suckless #escapekeysociety
 
 

X Ray Tech Lays Chip Secrets Bare IEEE Spectrum - IEEE Spectrum

Scientists and engineers in Switzerland and California have come up with a technique that can reveal the 3D design of a modern microprocessor without destroying it.

Typically today, such reverse engineering is a time-consuming process that involves painstakingly removing each of a chip’s many nanometers-thick interconnect layers and mapping them using a hierarchy of different imaging techniques, from optical microscopy for the larger features to electron microscopy for the tiniest features.

The inventors of the new technique, called ptychographic X-ray laminography, say it could be used by integrated circuit designers to verify that manufactured chips match their designs, or by government agencies concerned about “kill switches” or hardware trojans that could have secretly been added to ICs they depend on.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/semiconductors/design/xray-tech-lays-chip-secrets-bare
#science #engineering
 

X Ray Tech Lays Chip Secrets Bare IEEE Spectrum - IEEE Spectrum

Scientists and engineers in Switzerland and California have come up with a technique that can reveal the 3D design of a modern microprocessor without destroying it.

Typically today, such reverse engineering is a time-consuming process that involves painstakingly removing each of a chip’s many nanometers-thick interconnect layers and mapping them using a hierarchy of different imaging techniques, from optical microscopy for the larger features to electron microscopy for the tiniest features.

The inventors of the new technique, called ptychographic X-ray laminography, say it could be used by integrated circuit designers to verify that manufactured chips match their designs, or by government agencies concerned about “kill switches” or hardware trojans that could have secretly been added to ICs they depend on.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/semiconductors/design/xray-tech-lays-chip-secrets-bare
#science #engineering
 
 

A Moon Space Elevator Is Actually Feasible and Inexpensive: Study | Observer

Dangling the space elevator at this height would eliminate the need to place a large counterweight near Earth’s orbit to balance out the planet’s massive gravitational pull if the elevator were to be built from ground up. This method would also prevent any relative motion between Earth’s surface and space below the geostationary orbit area from bending or twisting the elevator.

These won’t be problems for the moon because the lunar gravitational pull is significantly smaller and the moon’s orbit is tidally locked, meaning that the moon keeps the same face turned toward Earth during its orbit, therefore no relative motion of the anchor point.

After doing the math, the researchers estimated that the simplest version of the lunar elevator would be a cable thinner than a pencil and weigh about 88,000 pounds, which is within the payload capacity of the next-generation NASA or SpaceX rocket.
https://observer.com/2019/09/moon-space-elevator-lunar-exploration-columbia-study/
#science #space #engineering
 

A Moon Space Elevator Is Actually Feasible and Inexpensive: Study | Observer

Dangling the space elevator at this height would eliminate the need to place a large counterweight near Earth’s orbit to balance out the planet’s massive gravitational pull if the elevator were to be built from ground up. This method would also prevent any relative motion between Earth’s surface and space below the geostationary orbit area from bending or twisting the elevator.

These won’t be problems for the moon because the lunar gravitational pull is significantly smaller and the moon’s orbit is tidally locked, meaning that the moon keeps the same face turned toward Earth during its orbit, therefore no relative motion of the anchor point.

After doing the math, the researchers estimated that the simplest version of the lunar elevator would be a cable thinner than a pencil and weigh about 88,000 pounds, which is within the payload capacity of the next-generation NASA or SpaceX rocket.
https://observer.com/2019/09/moon-space-elevator-lunar-exploration-columbia-study/
#science #space #engineering
 

Plant pot for the Moon


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto
Technology image of the week: ESA's lunar 3D printing competition winner with a printed version of her design

#engineering #technology #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Plant pot for the Moon


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto
Technology image of the week: ESA's lunar 3D printing competition winner with a printed version of her design

#engineering #technology #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

From black to green







Technology image of the week: Proba-V shows the rapid recovery of Argentinian grasslands from wildfire burn scars

#engineering #technology #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

From black to green







Technology image of the week: Proba-V shows the rapid recovery of Argentinian grasslands from wildfire burn scars

#engineering #technology #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 
Post by iFixit on some thin HP laptops and tablets that are reasonably easy to open up and repair.
Opening up a laptop like HP’s EliteBook 840 G6, EliteBook x360 830 G5, EliteBook x360 830 G6, or a convertible tablet like the Elite x2 G4—it’s almost too much.

Keep in mind as you scan these images and read this praise: these are not your uncle’s business laptop. These utterly serviceable laptops are not much thicker than a miserably scoring MacBook. The 840 G6 is 0.71 inches (1.8 cm) high when closed, or 0.12 inches (0.31 cm) thicker than the latest MacBook Pro. Only one of these devices requires liquid solvent and more than an hour to change the battery.

Using only one slightly specialized screwdriver, a T8 Torx, we managed to remove the keyboard, trackpad, pointing stick, display, fingerprint sensor, card reader, battery—we could go on. What’s important about those parts are that they’re the parts that are most likely to wear out or malfunction. Being able to replace those without damaging any other part of the device, and get it closed again, is a core tenet of building a responsible, repairable device. It’s a big part of why the EliteBook 840 G6 earned a 10 out of 10 on our repairability scale."
#Tablets #Laptops #Repair #Maintenance #Technology #Engineering
 
Post by iFixit on some thin HP laptops and tablets that are reasonably easy to open up and repair.
Opening up a laptop like HP’s EliteBook 840 G6, EliteBook x360 830 G5, EliteBook x360 830 G6, or a convertible tablet like the Elite x2 G4—it’s almost too much.

Keep in mind as you scan these images and read this praise: these are not your uncle’s business laptop. These utterly serviceable laptops are not much thicker than a miserably scoring MacBook. The 840 G6 is 0.71 inches (1.8 cm) high when closed, or 0.12 inches (0.31 cm) thicker than the latest MacBook Pro. Only one of these devices requires liquid solvent and more than an hour to change the battery.

Using only one slightly specialized screwdriver, a T8 Torx, we managed to remove the keyboard, trackpad, pointing stick, display, fingerprint sensor, card reader, battery—we could go on. What’s important about those parts are that they’re the parts that are most likely to wear out or malfunction. Being able to replace those without damaging any other part of the device, and get it closed again, is a core tenet of building a responsible, repairable device. It’s a big part of why the EliteBook 840 G6 earned a 10 out of 10 on our repairability scale."
#Tablets #Laptops #Repair #Maintenance #Technology #Engineering
 
"LEGOで振り子時計からトゥールビヨンまで作った。リメイク版【むにむに】" auf YouTube
an


How to build an analog clock out of #LEGO with a pendulum awesome #engineering
 

The false dichotomy of Worse Is Better vs. The Right Thing


I'll assume you know about the titular debate, if not here's a decent analysis. In this post I want to go further and show that both approaches are wrong. None of this should sound original to those who know design but unfortunately few in the developer community do.

Any kind of engineering is ultimately about people, their quirks and limitations. The Worse Is Better side understands the limitations of developers and correctly notes that complex products often don't ship at all because their developers run out of time and money before the first usable version sees the light of the day. Also given the iterative nature of design it makes sense to start small and make incremental advances so that potential users can stay in the loop and provide feedback.

The Right Thing side understands the limitations of end users and deservedly criticizes the WIB side for producing software with user-hostile UX. Because the opensource culture is heavily influenced by Unix the WIB approach permeates it to a large degree. However, at this point the mountain of evidence clearly outweighs whatever arguments the WIB side can offer. For example, the essay that sparkled the debate mentions the original Unix approach to handling interrupted system calls -- that approach has since been fixed virtually everywhere because it makes system call handling onerous. Or here now-well-known design expert Don Norman argues that command line experience in Unix is 'horrid'. That article is from 1981, a few years after Unix was released into the wild. Then there's The Unix-Haters Handbook from 1994 that describes something similar. And finally you can look at modern reports of companies getting pwned because some admin misconfigured an internet-facing server. The WIB side will say that, well, they should've known better, they should've read the manual, but I hope you can see the pattern. Git has a similar story: lots of cowboys ready to jump to its defense but also lots of pain and fucked up repos, and even some analysis of what exactly is wrong with Git's architecture and UI.

Like I said before, engineering is ultimately about people and here we have two sides: developers and users. Therefore the correct approach is to consider them both. To some extent this is what MVP is about but, as this article argues, in practice it's often interpreted as producing half-assed products for the sole purpose of getting feedback. The article calls the holistic approach SLC (Simple, Lovable, Complete) meaning that every iteration should be a complete product. This idea that even at 0.0.1 you're building a complete product is quite important. If you are a perfectionist, like myself, this is where to redirect your perfectionism -- at finding the most minimal but complete design at every iteration. When it comes to 'lovable', function-over-form minimalist designs often look attractive and age well, so even if you aren't good at aesthetics you can still do OK if you just keep it simple. Engineering is essentially an art of finding the sweet spot where a product has a high degree of design integrity and a simple mental model for its users but is also approachable for its developers.

#opensource #software #programming #engineering #methodology #design #therightthing #worseisbetter #mvp #slc #minimalism #perfectionism
 

The false dichotomy of Worse Is Better vs. The Right Thing


I'll assume you know about the titular debate, if not here's a decent analysis. In this post I want to go further and show that both approaches are wrong. None of this should sound original to those who know design but unfortunately few in the developer community do.

Any kind of engineering is ultimately about people, their quirks and limitations. The Worse Is Better side understands the limitations of developers and correctly notes that complex products often don't ship at all because their developers run out of time and money before the first usable version sees the light of the day. Also given the iterative nature of design it makes sense to start small and make incremental advances so that potential users can stay in the loop and provide feedback.

The Right Thing side understands the limitations of end users and deservedly criticizes the WIB side for producing software with user-hostile UX. Because the opensource culture is heavily influenced by Unix the WIB approach permeates it to a large degree. However, at this point the mountain of evidence clearly outweighs whatever arguments the WIB side can offer. For example, the essay that sparkled the debate mentions the original Unix approach to handling interrupted system calls -- that approach has since been fixed virtually everywhere because it makes system call handling onerous. Or here now-well-known design expert Don Norman argues that command line experience in Unix is 'horrid'. That article is from 1981, a few years after Unix was released into the wild. Then there's The Unix-Haters Handbook from 1994 that describes something similar. And finally you can look at modern reports of companies getting pwned because some admin misconfigured an internet-facing server. The WIB side will say that, well, they should've known better, they should've read the manual, but I hope you can see the pattern. Git has a similar story: lots of cowboys ready to jump to its defense but also lots of pain and fucked up repos, and even some analysis of what exactly is wrong with Git's architecture and UI.

Like I said before, engineering is ultimately about people and here we have two sides: developers and users. Therefore the correct approach is to consider them both. To some extent this is what MVP is about but, as this article argues, in practice it's often interpreted as producing half-assed products for the sole purpose of getting feedback. The article calls the holistic approach SLC (Simple, Lovable, Complete) meaning that every iteration should be a complete product. This idea that even at 0.0.1 you're building a complete product is quite important. If you are a perfectionist, like myself, this is where to redirect your perfectionism -- at finding the most minimal but complete design at every iteration. When it comes to 'lovable', function-over-form minimalist designs often look attractive and age well, so even if you aren't good at aesthetics you can still do OK if you just keep it simple. Engineering is essentially an art of finding the sweet spot where a product has a high degree of design integrity and a simple mental model for its users but is also approachable for its developers.

#opensource #software #programming #engineering #methodology #design #therightthing #worseisbetter #mvp #slc #minimalism #perfectionism
 

Little shopping cart speedster in Aisle 7 inspires Ford braking solution


Hah, great idea to apply technology from the #automotive sector to every day problems.
#Science #Engineering
 

How I Almost Destroyed a £50 million War Plane and The Normalisation of Deviance. - Fast Jet Performance


#sociology #psychology #science #engineering
 

How I Almost Destroyed a £50 million War Plane and The Normalisation of Deviance. - Fast Jet Performance


#sociology #psychology #science #engineering
 

How the Boeing 737 Max Disaster Looks to a Software Developer - IEEE Spectrum


#science #engineering #safety #greed #plutocracy
 

How the Boeing 737 Max Disaster Looks to a Software Developer - IEEE Spectrum


#science #engineering #safety #greed #plutocracy
 
3 Brothers From Baghdad and Their Remarkable 9th-Century Book of Inventions - Atlas Obscura

Really skilled ancient engineers! My deepest respect to the ancient inventors and engineers.

#science #history #engineering
 

Tüftler Eduard Wiebe und Andreas Neitzel erfinden Anhängerkupplung für Rollstühle


https://www.westfalen-blatt.de/OWL/Bielefeld/Bielefeld/3700867-Tueftler-Eduard-Wiebe-und-Andreas-Neitzel-erfinden-Anhaengerkupplung-fuer-Rollstuehle-Rollikup-Weltneuheit-aus-Bielefeld

#Rollstuhl #Inklusion #Engineering
 
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