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Interesting. A possible fossil of a turtle found that may have been crushed by the foot of a sauropod.
One day toward the end of the Jurassic Period, a long-necked, long-tailed sauropod dinosaur about the size of an elephant lumbered over a tidal flat in what is now Switzerland, leaving footprints wider than beach balls.
Maybe it heard a crunch. Because much later, near these footprints, a team of paleontologists found a damaged carapace from an extinct sea turtle species called Plesiochelys bigleri halfway pressed into the sediment. They argue, in a paper soon to be published in the Swiss Journal of Geosciences, that animal was stepped on.

“The evidence is pretty clear,” said Daniel Marty, a paleontologist at the Natural History Museum in Basel, Switzerland, who participated in the study. “It’s kind of a funny thing, and it also shows that these two animals were in the same paleoenvironment.”
[...]
Another explanation, said Jordan Mallon, a paleontologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature who also was not involved in the study, is that the fossil was simply crushed under the weight of the rocks above it over the millions of years it was buried. “I think they tell a plausible story, but it’s not a dead ringer,” he said.

Still, “it’s important to document fossils like this where you can try and show two species lived together,” Dr. Mallon said. “It’s only by doing that that we’re able to reconstruct ancient ecosystems.”"
#Science #Research #Fossils #Palaeontology #Sauropods #Turtles #Dinosaurs #Reptiles
 
Interesting. A possible fossil of a turtle found that may have been crushed by the foot of a sauropod.
One day toward the end of the Jurassic Period, a long-necked, long-tailed sauropod dinosaur about the size of an elephant lumbered over a tidal flat in what is now Switzerland, leaving footprints wider than beach balls.
Maybe it heard a crunch. Because much later, near these footprints, a team of paleontologists found a damaged carapace from an extinct sea turtle species called Plesiochelys bigleri halfway pressed into the sediment. They argue, in a paper soon to be published in the Swiss Journal of Geosciences, that animal was stepped on.

“The evidence is pretty clear,” said Daniel Marty, a paleontologist at the Natural History Museum in Basel, Switzerland, who participated in the study. “It’s kind of a funny thing, and it also shows that these two animals were in the same paleoenvironment.”
[...]
Another explanation, said Jordan Mallon, a paleontologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature who also was not involved in the study, is that the fossil was simply crushed under the weight of the rocks above it over the millions of years it was buried. “I think they tell a plausible story, but it’s not a dead ringer,” he said.

Still, “it’s important to document fossils like this where you can try and show two species lived together,” Dr. Mallon said. “It’s only by doing that that we’re able to reconstruct ancient ecosystems.”"
#Science #Research #Fossils #Palaeontology #Sauropods #Turtles #Dinosaurs #Reptiles
 

New Dinosaur Species With Spiky Backbone Discovered in Argentina


Paleontologists in Argentina have uncovered a dinosaur unlike anything ever seen before. Alive some 140 million years ago, these majestic herbivores featured long, forward-pointing spikes running along their necks and backs. These spikes may have served a defensive role, but their exact purpose now presents a fascinating new mystery.

The discovery of the new species of dicraeosauridae, christened Bajadasaurus pronuspinax, was revealed in Scientific Reports.

A reproduction of its spiny neck was exhibited in the Cultural Science Center in Buenos Aires.

#dinosaurs #nature #paleontology #BajadasaurusPronuspinax
 

New Dinosaur Species With Spiky Backbone Discovered in Argentina


Paleontologists in Argentina have uncovered a dinosaur unlike anything ever seen before. Alive some 140 million years ago, these majestic herbivores featured long, forward-pointing spikes running along their necks and backs. These spikes may have served a defensive role, but their exact purpose now presents a fascinating new mystery.

The discovery of the new species of dicraeosauridae, christened Bajadasaurus pronuspinax, was revealed in Scientific Reports.

A reproduction of its spiny neck was exhibited in the Cultural Science Center in Buenos Aires.

#dinosaurs #nature #paleontology #BajadasaurusPronuspinax
 
#dinosaurs #science
 
#dinosaurs #science
 
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