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Items tagged with: Repair

The story behind the story

No one who does data recovery would read through thousands of personal emails…
From @dantoujours (twitter)

#Hunter #Biden #email #scandal #Giuliani #laptop #repair #hoax

 

The story behind the story

No one who does data recovery would read through thousands of personal emails…
From @dantoujours (twitter)

#Hunter #Biden #email #scandal #Giuliani #laptop #repair #hoax

 

The story behind the story

No one who does data recovery would read through thousands of personal emails…
From @dantoujours (twitter)

#Hunter #Biden #email #scandal #Giuliani #laptop #repair #hoax

 
#iFixit #medical #repair

iFixit launches massive repair database for ventilators and other medical devices - The Verge


Bild/Foto
Teardown and repair website iFixit has just posted what its CEO Kyle Wiens says is “the most comprehensive online resource for medical repair professionals.” The new database contains dedicated sections for clinical, laboratory, and medical support equipment, in addition to numerous other categories of devices. It also provides more than 13,000 manuals from hundreds of medical device manufacturers.

Wiens says the effort began with a crowdsourcing campaign to collect repair information for hospital equipment, with a focus on “ventilator documentation, anesthesia systems, and respiratory analyzers — devices widely used to support COVID-19 patients.” But the effort grew from there, spanning more than two months as iFixit added dozens more staff members to the project; began talking to more biomedical technicians, doctors, and nurses about their day-to-day needs; and started collecting and cataloging information from libraries and other sources.
 
#iFixit #medical #repair

iFixit launches massive repair database for ventilators and other medical devices - The Verge


Bild/Foto
Teardown and repair website iFixit has just posted what its CEO Kyle Wiens says is “the most comprehensive online resource for medical repair professionals.” The new database contains dedicated sections for clinical, laboratory, and medical support equipment, in addition to numerous other categories of devices. It also provides more than 13,000 manuals from hundreds of medical device manufacturers.

Wiens says the effort began with a crowdsourcing campaign to collect repair information for hospital equipment, with a focus on “ventilator documentation, anesthesia systems, and respiratory analyzers — devices widely used to support COVID-19 patients.” But the effort grew from there, spanning more than two months as iFixit added dozens more staff members to the project; began talking to more biomedical technicians, doctors, and nurses about their day-to-day needs; and started collecting and cataloging information from libraries and other sources.
 
Does anyone here have any experiences with Fairphones?
The idea sounds lovely: a modular built repairable phone running vanilla Android with at least 5yrs support and as a fair trade product.

Anyone can order spare parts.
It really is repairable. See this post by @Mikel Diaspora for an independent report (thanks for the pointer, Mikel).

#Fairphone #repair #Fair-trade #Android #smartphone
 
Does anyone here have any experiences with Fairphones?
The idea sounds lovely: a modular built repairable phone running vanilla Android with at least 5yrs support and as a fair trade product.

Anyone can order spare parts.
It really is repairable. See this post by @Mikel Diaspora for an independent report (thanks for the pointer, Mikel).

#Fairphone #repair #Fair-trade #Android #smartphone
 
Post by iFixit on some thin HP laptops and tablets that are reasonably easy to open up and repair.
Opening up a laptop like HP’s EliteBook 840 G6, EliteBook x360 830 G5, EliteBook x360 830 G6, or a convertible tablet like the Elite x2 G4—it’s almost too much.

Keep in mind as you scan these images and read this praise: these are not your uncle’s business laptop. These utterly serviceable laptops are not much thicker than a miserably scoring MacBook. The 840 G6 is 0.71 inches (1.8 cm) high when closed, or 0.12 inches (0.31 cm) thicker than the latest MacBook Pro. Only one of these devices requires liquid solvent and more than an hour to change the battery.

Using only one slightly specialized screwdriver, a T8 Torx, we managed to remove the keyboard, trackpad, pointing stick, display, fingerprint sensor, card reader, battery—we could go on. What’s important about those parts are that they’re the parts that are most likely to wear out or malfunction. Being able to replace those without damaging any other part of the device, and get it closed again, is a core tenet of building a responsible, repairable device. It’s a big part of why the EliteBook 840 G6 earned a 10 out of 10 on our repairability scale."
#Tablets #Laptops #Repair #Maintenance #Technology #Engineering
 
Post by iFixit on some thin HP laptops and tablets that are reasonably easy to open up and repair.
Opening up a laptop like HP’s EliteBook 840 G6, EliteBook x360 830 G5, EliteBook x360 830 G6, or a convertible tablet like the Elite x2 G4—it’s almost too much.

Keep in mind as you scan these images and read this praise: these are not your uncle’s business laptop. These utterly serviceable laptops are not much thicker than a miserably scoring MacBook. The 840 G6 is 0.71 inches (1.8 cm) high when closed, or 0.12 inches (0.31 cm) thicker than the latest MacBook Pro. Only one of these devices requires liquid solvent and more than an hour to change the battery.

Using only one slightly specialized screwdriver, a T8 Torx, we managed to remove the keyboard, trackpad, pointing stick, display, fingerprint sensor, card reader, battery—we could go on. What’s important about those parts are that they’re the parts that are most likely to wear out or malfunction. Being able to replace those without damaging any other part of the device, and get it closed again, is a core tenet of building a responsible, repairable device. It’s a big part of why the EliteBook 840 G6 earned a 10 out of 10 on our repairability scale."
#Tablets #Laptops #Repair #Maintenance #Technology #Engineering
 
Bild/Foto
It took one evening but I fixed my HP laptop hinges with baking soda and superglue. Also relaxed the hinges a little so now it actually opens with one hand (and hopefully doesn't break again very soon). There is also spare display lid on Aliexpress costing about $35, since everything else seems okay maybe I will buy it if anything else breaks. Some photos of the problem and fixing process follow below.

The problem:


These tiny screws and nuts surrounded with thin plastic are supposed to withstand the force required to open/close 15.6" display lid. It doesn't seem much but if you try to turn hinge with your fingers it is easily 5-6 kilo of effort. I barely could turn it using my pinky finger. Huge display creates a lot of leverage.



Tools used:


Baking soda and superglue when mixed create instant and very strong polymer with very strong adhesion to almost everything except polyethylene. Unlike epoxy which takes time to harden this happens instantly (and also releases some poisonous vapors in the process so ventilation won't hurt). It doesn't stick well to anything covered with oil so WD-40 (or any oil) could be used to prevent it and help clean your hands. After it polymerizes it remains a bit soft for very short time and can be cut with knife to shape it a bit. Having a pet nearby is also important because their presence has therapeutic effect and prevents you from throwing and breaking stuff in frustration when something goes wrong - you would be ashamed to do it in front of your dog, right? Right.



The process:


Remove most of broken plastic because you want to put as much compound there as possible. Remove any dirt. Protect places you don't want to get superglue into. Since we are gluing in a nut we protect the treads by screwing in a lubricated bolt - the glue won't stick to it. I positioned it in the right place and fixed it with a little superglue so it doesn't move. Then put a little baking soda around it and add a drop of superglue. It turns into hard plastic instantly! Then add some more soda until there is no liquid glue visible. Blow it off. Cut unwanted extras and repeat. Done.

I also added some around nuts still in place - because they WILL break at some point.




Other side is trickier - it has some cables running between these nuts. Also nuts here are completely demolished. No, the laptop wasn't dropped. It spent three months next to my couch where the lid was opened about four times per day. What sort of crap they make this plastic of?




Anyway it will be hard to cut the canal for cables later and I want to mold the nuts in place using as much compound as possible to I use chewing gum (yuck!) as a placeholder. Then repeat previous steps. After nuts are done. chewing gum is cut out with a knife. Looks ugly but it works.

Now polish them a bit with sandpaper and assemble the display back. It works! Let's see how long it lasts.

As you can see, HP could easily make these parts more robust. Just a little more plastic around, longer screws, not so overtightened hinges. It is definitely by design.

I can say one good thing about HP though. Their service manual is pretty clear, also all screws are marked on the actual parts so just by looking at the part you can say which screw goes where. They even put V and X marks on every hole which tell you if you should screw something in it or not. There are only three kinds of screws used to do this repair (take off the bottom lid, display lid and hinges). All cables are marked in correct orientation and order so you won't even try to insert display cable upside down. It is not too bad when it comes to serviceability.

But it is unlikely that I am going to buy another budget HP again unless they fix their shit. It used to be better. Now it reminds me of cheap Acer laptops back in the day when all Acers were cheap crap.

#diy #repair #hp #PlannedObsolescence #wd-40 #lifehacking #fixit #consumerism
 
Bild/Foto
It took one evening but I fixed my HP laptop hinges with baking soda and superglue. Also relaxed the hinges a little so now it actually opens with one hand (and hopefully doesn't break again very soon). There is also spare display lid on Aliexpress costing about $35, since everything else seems okay maybe I will buy it if anything else breaks. Some photos of the problem and fixing process follow below.

The problem:


These tiny screws and nuts surrounded with thin plastic are supposed to withstand the force required to open/close 15.6" display lid. It doesn't seem much but if you try to turn hinge with your fingers it is easily 5-6 kilo of effort. I barely could turn it using my pinky finger. Huge display creates a lot of leverage.



Tools used:


Baking soda and superglue when mixed create instant and very strong polymer with very strong adhesion to almost everything except polyethylene. Unlike epoxy which takes time to harden this happens instantly (and also releases some poisonous vapors in the process so ventilation won't hurt). It doesn't stick well to anything covered with oil so WD-40 (or any oil) could be used to prevent it and help clean your hands. After it polymerizes it remains a bit soft for very short time and can be cut with knife to shape it a bit. Having a pet nearby is also important because their presence has therapeutic effect and prevents you from throwing and breaking stuff in frustration when something goes wrong - you would be ashamed to do it in front of your dog, right? Right.



The process:


Remove most of broken plastic because you want to put as much compound there as possible. Remove any dirt. Protect places you don't want to get superglue into. Since we are gluing in a nut we protect the treads by screwing in a lubricated bolt - the glue won't stick to it. I positioned it in the right place and fixed it with a little superglue so it doesn't move. Then put a little baking soda around it and add a drop of superglue. It turns into hard plastic instantly! Then add some more soda until there is no liquid glue visible. Blow it off. Cut unwanted extras and repeat. Done.

I also added some around nuts still in place - because they WILL break at some point.




Other side is trickier - it has some cables running between these nuts. Also nuts here are completely demolished. No, the laptop wasn't dropped. It spent three months next to my couch where the lid was opened about four times per day. What sort of crap they make this plastic of?




Anyway it will be hard to cut the canal for cables later and I want to mold the nuts in place using as much compound as possible to I use chewing gum (yuck!) as a placeholder. Then repeat previous steps. After nuts are done. chewing gum is cut out with a knife. Looks ugly but it works.

Now polish them a bit with sandpaper and assemble the display back. It works! Let's see how long it lasts.

As you can see, HP could easily make these parts more robust. Just a little more plastic around, longer screws, not so overtightened hinges. It is definitely by design.

I can say one good thing about HP though. Their service manual is pretty clear, also all screws are marked on the actual parts so just by looking at the part you can say which screw goes where. They even put V and X marks on every hole which tell you if you should screw something in it or not. There are only three kinds of screws used to do this repair (take off the bottom lid, display lid and hinges). All cables are marked in correct orientation and order so you won't even try to insert display cable upside down. It is not too bad when it comes to serviceability.

But it is unlikely that I am going to buy another budget HP again unless they fix their shit. It used to be better. Now it reminds me of cheap Acer laptops back in the day when all Acers were cheap crap.

#diy #repair #hp #PlannedObsolescence #wd-40 #lifehacking #fixit #consumerism
 
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