social.sokoll.com

Search

Items tagged with: GlobalWarming

#au #australia #climatechange #climate #globalwarming
 
#au #australia #climatechange #climate #globalwarming
 

Greenland ice losses rising faster than expected



Greenland is losing ice seven times faster than in the 1990s and is tracking the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's high-end climate warming scenario, which would see 400 million more people exposed to coastal flooding by 2100.
yikes
#climate #climatechange #globalwarming
 

Greenland ice losses rising faster than expected



Greenland is losing ice seven times faster than in the 1990s and is tracking the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's high-end climate warming scenario, which would see 400 million more people exposed to coastal flooding by 2100.
yikes
#climate #climatechange #globalwarming
 

Greta Thunberg to US politicians: 'Sorry, you're not trying hard enough' | BBC News

"Don't invite us here to just tell us how inspiring we are without actually doing anything about it

...[this is] not about youth activism. This is not about us... we don't want to be heard. We want the science to be heard."

Instead of submitting a personal statement... she sent Congress a major report on global warming along with eight sentences of her own.

"I am submitting this report as my testimony because I don't want you to listen to me," she said. "I want you to listen to the scientists. And I want you to unite behind the science. And then I want you to take action."

In some places, like Victoria in Australia, students and public workers are being actively encouraged to walk out of school and work.

"We want our kids to be engaged in the world around them, so we don't think it's fair to criticise students for holding a peaceful protest about an issue as important as this" [government spokesman to Melbourne-based newspaper].
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-49738225

#environment #pollution #carbon #ClimateChange #ClimateCrisis #ClimateEmergency #GlobalWarming #science #USPolitics #politics #GretaThunberg
 

Greta Thunberg to US politicians: 'Sorry, you're not trying hard enough' | BBC News

"Don't invite us here to just tell us how inspiring we are without actually doing anything about it

...[this is] not about youth activism. This is not about us... we don't want to be heard. We want the science to be heard."

Instead of submitting a personal statement... she sent Congress a major report on global warming along with eight sentences of her own.

"I am submitting this report as my testimony because I don't want you to listen to me," she said. "I want you to listen to the scientists. And I want you to unite behind the science. And then I want you to take action."

In some places, like Victoria in Australia, students and public workers are being actively encouraged to walk out of school and work.

"We want our kids to be engaged in the world around them, so we don't think it's fair to criticise students for holding a peaceful protest about an issue as important as this" [government spokesman to Melbourne-based newspaper].
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-49738225

#environment #pollution #carbon #ClimateChange #ClimateCrisis #ClimateEmergency #GlobalWarming #science #USPolitics #politics #GretaThunberg
 

There was worldwide outcry when the Notre Dame cathedral was on fire. Why is there not the same level of outrage for the fires destroying the #AmazonRainforest?


#environment #globalwarming #climatechange #Brazil #forestfire #AmazonFires

Twitter: WWF UK on Twitter (WWF UK)

 

There was worldwide outcry when the Notre Dame cathedral was on fire. Why is there not the same level of outrage for the fires destroying the #AmazonRainforest?


#environment #globalwarming #climatechange #Brazil #forestfire #AmazonFires

Twitter: WWF UK on Twitter (WWF UK)

 
Iceland to lay a plaque marking it's first glacier to be lost to climate change.
The first of Iceland’s 400 glaciers to be lost to the climate crisis will be remembered with a memorial plaque – and a sombre warning for the future – to be unveiled by scientists and local people next month.

The former Okjökull glacier, which a century ago covered 15 sq km (5.8 sq miles) of mountainside in western Iceland and measured 50 metres thick, has shrunk to barely 1 sq km of ice less than 15 metres deep and lost its status as a glacier.

Researchers from Rice University in Houston, Texas, a leading Icelandic author, Andri Snær Magnason, and the geologist Oddur Sigurðsson will lead the unveiling ceremony at the site in Borgarfjörður on 18 August, local media said.

“In the next 200 years, all our glaciers are expected to follow the same path,” the plaque reads, in Icelandic and English. “This monument is to acknowledge that we know what is happening and what needs to be done. Only you know if we did it.”

The memorial is dated August 2019 and also carries the words “415ppm CO2”, referring to the record-breaking level of 415 parts per million of carbon dioxide recorded in the atmosphere in May this year.
#GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #Glaciers #Environment #Iceland
 
Iceland to lay a plaque marking it's first glacier to be lost to climate change.
The first of Iceland’s 400 glaciers to be lost to the climate crisis will be remembered with a memorial plaque – and a sombre warning for the future – to be unveiled by scientists and local people next month.

The former Okjökull glacier, which a century ago covered 15 sq km (5.8 sq miles) of mountainside in western Iceland and measured 50 metres thick, has shrunk to barely 1 sq km of ice less than 15 metres deep and lost its status as a glacier.

Researchers from Rice University in Houston, Texas, a leading Icelandic author, Andri Snær Magnason, and the geologist Oddur Sigurðsson will lead the unveiling ceremony at the site in Borgarfjörður on 18 August, local media said.

“In the next 200 years, all our glaciers are expected to follow the same path,” the plaque reads, in Icelandic and English. “This monument is to acknowledge that we know what is happening and what needs to be done. Only you know if we did it.”

The memorial is dated August 2019 and also carries the words “415ppm CO2”, referring to the record-breaking level of 415 parts per million of carbon dioxide recorded in the atmosphere in May this year.
#GlobalWarming #ClimateChange #Glaciers #Environment #Iceland
 
#globalwarming #heatisland #treecanopy #urbanareas

"The idea of the heat island -- that densely built-up urban areas are considerably hotter than the rural and semi-rural landscapes that surround them -- has been extensively studied and is widely accepted by academics and the public.

But a new study by a Concordia researcher takes a closer look at the phenomenon and what can be done to mitigate it. According to Carly Ziter, an assistant professor of biology in the Faculty of Arts and Science, extensive tree canopy cover in an urban area can dramatically reduce the temperatures of their immediate environs -- enough to make a significant difference even within a few city blocks.

In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Ziter argues that there is a non-linear relationship between canopy cover and temperature reduction: when canopy cover reaches a certain threshold, temperatures will begin to drop far more dramatically than they do below that point.

"We found that to get the most cooling, you have to have about 40 per cent canopy cover, and this was strongest around the scale of a city block," she says. "So if your neighbourhood has less than 40 per cent canopy cover, you'll get a little bit of cooling, but not very much. Once you tip over that threshold, you really see large increases in how much you can cool areas off."

She adds that the difference between areas with heavy canopy cover and those that are treeless can be as high as four or five degrees Celsius, even within just a few hundred metres of each other.

The effects of shading contribute to that decrease but are not the only factor.

"Trees transpire," she explains. "They give off water vapour, almost like a little air conditioner."

This transpiration occurs mainly during the day. Her research shows that during nighttime there is a much smaller difference in temperature between areas with significant canopy cover and those without".

City trees can offset neighborhood heat islands, Concordia researcher says | EurekAlert! Science News #ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
 
#globalwarming #heatisland #treecanopy #urbanareas

"The idea of the heat island -- that densely built-up urban areas are considerably hotter than the rural and semi-rural landscapes that surround them -- has been extensively studied and is widely accepted by academics and the public.

But a new study by a Concordia researcher takes a closer look at the phenomenon and what can be done to mitigate it. According to Carly Ziter, an assistant professor of biology in the Faculty of Arts and Science, extensive tree canopy cover in an urban area can dramatically reduce the temperatures of their immediate environs -- enough to make a significant difference even within a few city blocks.

In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Ziter argues that there is a non-linear relationship between canopy cover and temperature reduction: when canopy cover reaches a certain threshold, temperatures will begin to drop far more dramatically than they do below that point.

"We found that to get the most cooling, you have to have about 40 per cent canopy cover, and this was strongest around the scale of a city block," she says. "So if your neighbourhood has less than 40 per cent canopy cover, you'll get a little bit of cooling, but not very much. Once you tip over that threshold, you really see large increases in how much you can cool areas off."

She adds that the difference between areas with heavy canopy cover and those that are treeless can be as high as four or five degrees Celsius, even within just a few hundred metres of each other.

The effects of shading contribute to that decrease but are not the only factor.

"Trees transpire," she explains. "They give off water vapour, almost like a little air conditioner."

This transpiration occurs mainly during the day. Her research shows that during nighttime there is a much smaller difference in temperature between areas with significant canopy cover and those without".

City trees can offset neighborhood heat islands, Concordia researcher says | EurekAlert! Science News #ViaDiasporaNativeWebApp
 
Later posts Earlier posts