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OK, I'm going to get my prediction in early, here's some of what I expect to happen (in England, as the devolved governments have their own rules) over the next couple of months:
  • some kind of "lockdown" with more holes (exceptions) than a Swiss cheese from Thursday
  • pubs, restaurants and non-essential shops busy until "lockdown" kicks in, as people want to use their "last chance"
  • numbers will go down a bit towards the end of November and into early December
  • government will proclaim it a success and announce a "ceasefire" or "truce" for Christmas where people can visit their families in order to "save Christmas"
  • the virus will still not understand or know what a "ceasefire" or "truce" is and happily continue doing what it does best: infecting and making people ill, or even killing them
  • in January numbers will start to rise again, first calls for another "lockdown" will be made. Which the government will ignore. Track & Trace still not working
  • by the end of February another "lockdown" is announced
(and that's ignoring the mess that Brexit will bring, deal or no-deal, as nobody has the time & resources to prepare for it during lockdown)

#UK #England #Brexit #politics #Coronavirus #Covid19 #pandemic #government #lockdown
 
Just posted on my personal blog, 10 pictures of the autumn colours in West Berkshire from my staycation:

AUTUMN COLOURS ALONG THE KENNET & AVON CANAL IN WEST BERKSHIRE

#WestBerkshire #England #picture #pictures #photography #photo #photos #landscape #autumn #autumncolours #colourful
Autumn colours along the Kennet & Avon Canal in West Berkshire
 
With greetings to all those ********** protesting against the Covid-19 measures in London (and possibly elsewhere). But then again they will probably claim he's a paid actor and it's all a plot by the evil deep state or something.

Chris thought coronavirus was 'bullsh*t'... this is his powerful message from his intensive care bed

#UK #England #Covid19 #Coronavirus #health #NHS
 
With greetings to all those ********** protesting against the Covid-19 measures in London (and possibly elsewhere). But then again they will probably claim he's a paid actor and it's all a plot by the evil deep state or something.

Chris thought coronavirus was 'bullsh*t'... this is his powerful message from his intensive care bed

#UK #England #Covid19 #Coronavirus #health #NHS
 
Just posted on my personal blog, some music for a Friday evening:

SPACE & TIME X2

#music #WolfAlice #video #KEXP #rock #band #bands #England #UK
Space & Time x2
 
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On this day in motoring - Tuesday 18th August 1959


http://www.365daysofmotoring.com/showonthisday/article/12829

On This Day
Tuesday 18th August 1959
61 years ago

The first pictures of BMC’s new compact four-seater Mini, designed by Alec Issigonis, were revealed to the press. Designated by Leonard Lord as project ADO15 (Amalgamated Drawing Office project number 15) and the product of the Morris design team, the Mini came about because of a fuel shortage caused by the 1956 Suez Crisis. Petrol was once again rationed in the UK, sales of large cars slumped, and the market for German bubble cars boomed. Lord, the somewhat autocratic head of BMC, reportedly detested these cars so much that he vowed to rid the streets of them and design a 'proper miniature car'. He laid down some basic design requirements: the car should be contained within a box that measured 10×4×4 feet (3.0×1.2×1.2 m); and the passenger accommodation should occupy 6 feet (1.8 m) of the 10-foot (3.0 m) length; and the engine, for reasons of cost, should be an existing unit. Issigonis, who had been working for Alvis, had been recruited back to BMC in 1955 and, with his skills in designing small cars, was a natural for the task. The team that designed the Mini was remarkably small: as well as Issigonis, there was Jack Daniels (who had worked with him on the Morris Minor), Chris Kingham (who had been with him at Alvis), two engineering students and four draughtsmen. Together, by October 1957, they had designed and built the original prototype, which was affectionately named "The Orange Box" because of its colour. The ADO15 used a conventional BMC A-Series four-cylinder, water-cooled engine, but departed from tradition by mounting it transversely, with the engine-oil-lubricated, four-speed transmission in the sump, and by employing front-wheel drive. Almost all small front-wheel-drive cars developed since have used a similar configuration, except with the transmission usually separately enclosed rather than using the engine oil. The radiator was mounted at the left side of the car so that the engine-mounted fan could be retained, but with reversed pitch so that it blew air into the natural low pressure area under the front wing. This location saved vehicle length, but had the disadvantage of feeding the radiator with air that had been heated by passing over the engine. It also exposed the entire ignition system to the direct ingress of rainwater through the grille. The suspension system, designed by Issigonis's friend Dr. Alex Moulton at Moulton Developments Limited, used compact rubber cones instead of conventional springs. This space-saving design also featured rising progressive-rate springing of the cones, and provided some natural damping, in addition to the normal dampers. Built into the subframes, the rubber cone system gave a raw and bumpy ride accentuated by the woven-webbing seats, but the rigidity of the rubber cones, together with the wheels' positioning at the corners of the car, gave the Mini go kart-like handling. Initially an interconnected fluid system was planned, similar to the one that Alec Issigonis and Alex Moulton were working on in the mid-1950s at Alvis. They had assessed the mechanically interconnected Citroën 2CV suspension at that time (according to an interview by Moulton with Car Magazine in the late 1990s),[citation needed] which inspired the design of the Hydrolastic suspension system for the Mini and Morris/Austin 1100, to try to keep the benefits of the 2CV system (ride comfort, body levelling, keeping the roadwheel under good control and the tyres in contact with the road), but with added roll stiffness that the 2CV lacked. The short development time of the car meant this was not ready in time for the Mini's launch. The system intended for the Mini was further developed and the hydrolastic system was first used on the Morris 1100, launched in 1962; the Mini gained the system later in 1964. Ten-inch (254 mm) wheels were specified, so new tyres had to be developed, the initial contract going to Dunlop. Issigonis went to Dunlop stating that he wanted even smaller, 8 in (203 mm) wheels (even though he had already settled on ten-inch). An agreement was made on the ten-inch size, after Dunlop rejected the eight-inch proposition. Sliding windows allowed storage pockets in the hollow doors; reportedly Issigonis sized them to fit a bottle of Gordon's Gin. The boot lid was hinged at the bottom so that the car could be driven with it open to increase luggage space. On early cars the number plate was hinged at the top so that it could swing down to remain visible when the boot lid was open. This feature was later discontinued after it was discovered that exhaust gases could leak into the cockpit when the boot was open. The Mini was designed as a monocoque shell with welded seams visible on the outside of the car running down the A and C pillars, and between the body and the floor pan. Those that ran from the base of the A-pillar to the wheel well were described as 'everted' (lit., 'turned outward') to provide more room for the front seat occupants. To further simplify construction, the hinges for the doors and boot lid were mounted externally. Production models differed from the prototypes by the addition of front and rear subframes to the unibody to take the suspension loads, and by having the engine mounted the other way round, with the carburettor at the back rather than at the front. This layout required an extra gear between engine and transmission to reverse the direction of rotation at the input to the transmission. Having the carburettor behind the engine reduced carburettor icing, but the distributor was then exposed to water coming in through the grille. The engine size was reduced from 948 to 848 cc (57.9 to 51.7 cu in); this, in conjunction with a small increase in the car's width, cut the top speed from 90 to 72 mph (145 to 116 km/h). In 1959, BMC and Alec Issigonis won the Dewar Trophy, for the design and production of the Mini. The Mini shape had become so well known that by the 1990s, Rover Group – the heirs to BMC – were able to register its design as a trademark in its own right.
#Cars #Motoring #Automotive #Mini #England #OnThisDay
 
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On this day in motoring - Tuesday 18th August 1959


http://www.365daysofmotoring.com/showonthisday/article/12829

On This Day
Tuesday 18th August 1959
61 years ago

The first pictures of BMC’s new compact four-seater Mini, designed by Alec Issigonis, were revealed to the press. Designated by Leonard Lord as project ADO15 (Amalgamated Drawing Office project number 15) and the product of the Morris design team, the Mini came about because of a fuel shortage caused by the 1956 Suez Crisis. Petrol was once again rationed in the UK, sales of large cars slumped, and the market for German bubble cars boomed. Lord, the somewhat autocratic head of BMC, reportedly detested these cars so much that he vowed to rid the streets of them and design a 'proper miniature car'. He laid down some basic design requirements: the car should be contained within a box that measured 10×4×4 feet (3.0×1.2×1.2 m); and the passenger accommodation should occupy 6 feet (1.8 m) of the 10-foot (3.0 m) length; and the engine, for reasons of cost, should be an existing unit. Issigonis, who had been working for Alvis, had been recruited back to BMC in 1955 and, with his skills in designing small cars, was a natural for the task. The team that designed the Mini was remarkably small: as well as Issigonis, there was Jack Daniels (who had worked with him on the Morris Minor), Chris Kingham (who had been with him at Alvis), two engineering students and four draughtsmen. Together, by October 1957, they had designed and built the original prototype, which was affectionately named "The Orange Box" because of its colour. The ADO15 used a conventional BMC A-Series four-cylinder, water-cooled engine, but departed from tradition by mounting it transversely, with the engine-oil-lubricated, four-speed transmission in the sump, and by employing front-wheel drive. Almost all small front-wheel-drive cars developed since have used a similar configuration, except with the transmission usually separately enclosed rather than using the engine oil. The radiator was mounted at the left side of the car so that the engine-mounted fan could be retained, but with reversed pitch so that it blew air into the natural low pressure area under the front wing. This location saved vehicle length, but had the disadvantage of feeding the radiator with air that had been heated by passing over the engine. It also exposed the entire ignition system to the direct ingress of rainwater through the grille. The suspension system, designed by Issigonis's friend Dr. Alex Moulton at Moulton Developments Limited, used compact rubber cones instead of conventional springs. This space-saving design also featured rising progressive-rate springing of the cones, and provided some natural damping, in addition to the normal dampers. Built into the subframes, the rubber cone system gave a raw and bumpy ride accentuated by the woven-webbing seats, but the rigidity of the rubber cones, together with the wheels' positioning at the corners of the car, gave the Mini go kart-like handling. Initially an interconnected fluid system was planned, similar to the one that Alec Issigonis and Alex Moulton were working on in the mid-1950s at Alvis. They had assessed the mechanically interconnected Citroën 2CV suspension at that time (according to an interview by Moulton with Car Magazine in the late 1990s),[citation needed] which inspired the design of the Hydrolastic suspension system for the Mini and Morris/Austin 1100, to try to keep the benefits of the 2CV system (ride comfort, body levelling, keeping the roadwheel under good control and the tyres in contact with the road), but with added roll stiffness that the 2CV lacked. The short development time of the car meant this was not ready in time for the Mini's launch. The system intended for the Mini was further developed and the hydrolastic system was first used on the Morris 1100, launched in 1962; the Mini gained the system later in 1964. Ten-inch (254 mm) wheels were specified, so new tyres had to be developed, the initial contract going to Dunlop. Issigonis went to Dunlop stating that he wanted even smaller, 8 in (203 mm) wheels (even though he had already settled on ten-inch). An agreement was made on the ten-inch size, after Dunlop rejected the eight-inch proposition. Sliding windows allowed storage pockets in the hollow doors; reportedly Issigonis sized them to fit a bottle of Gordon's Gin. The boot lid was hinged at the bottom so that the car could be driven with it open to increase luggage space. On early cars the number plate was hinged at the top so that it could swing down to remain visible when the boot lid was open. This feature was later discontinued after it was discovered that exhaust gases could leak into the cockpit when the boot was open. The Mini was designed as a monocoque shell with welded seams visible on the outside of the car running down the A and C pillars, and between the body and the floor pan. Those that ran from the base of the A-pillar to the wheel well were described as 'everted' (lit., 'turned outward') to provide more room for the front seat occupants. To further simplify construction, the hinges for the doors and boot lid were mounted externally. Production models differed from the prototypes by the addition of front and rear subframes to the unibody to take the suspension loads, and by having the engine mounted the other way round, with the carburettor at the back rather than at the front. This layout required an extra gear between engine and transmission to reverse the direction of rotation at the input to the transmission. Having the carburettor behind the engine reduced carburettor icing, but the distributor was then exposed to water coming in through the grille. The engine size was reduced from 948 to 848 cc (57.9 to 51.7 cu in); this, in conjunction with a small increase in the car's width, cut the top speed from 90 to 72 mph (145 to 116 km/h). In 1959, BMC and Alec Issigonis won the Dewar Trophy, for the design and production of the Mini. The Mini shape had become so well known that by the 1990s, Rover Group – the heirs to BMC – were able to register its design as a trademark in its own right.
#Cars #Motoring #Automotive #Mini #England #OnThisDay
 
Schau dir "For 21 Years, No-One In Britain Knew How Long An Inch Was" auf YouTube an https://youtu.be/mmh819Lfgfs

The sandwich scene is the best!
#science #metric #history #england
 
When the left side of the mouth says the opposite of the right side of the mouth. Or something like that. The irony of the internal single market in the UK vs the internal single market of the EU. One is good, the other is bad. Frictionless trade is good when in the UK, but not needed any more with the EU.

UK single market white paper: “irony so bitter it makes your eyes bleed”

#Brexit #UK #England #Scotland #singlemarket #frictionless #frictionlesstrade #trade #politics #irony
UK single market white paper: “irony so bitter it makes your eyes bleed”
 
The Norman Conquest didn’t change ordinary people’s lives very much | Ars Technica
A recent study suggests that after 1066, English food was as terrible but filling as before.
😂 😂 😂
#science #England
 
I wonder how many people have pointed out to him that the last two world champions are France and Germany. Who are both in the EU.....

https://twitter.com/SteveBarclay/status/1194966699621208064?s=19

#Brexit #UK #England #EU #politics #football

Twitter: Steve Barclay on Twitter (Steve Barclay)

 
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Sunset at the south coast with a lone bird, a stand up paddle board, a flock of geese and to finish it off a ********* big cruise ship getting in the way. That's me signing off for today, off to drive home.
#sunset #England #coast #Southampton
 
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Told you sunset was going to be romantic (if you're into chimneys, factories, chemical plants and that kind of stuff)
#sunset #England #coast #beach #Southampton
 
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After birdwatching pint and burger in the seaside pub beer garden.
#pub #England #pint #realale #Hampshire #coast #bankholiday
 
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Bank holiday Sunday sun at the south coast, Titchfield Haven. Taking a short break from birdwatching at the nature reserve after watching a Kingfisher the closest I've seen one so far.
#bankholiday #England #coast #sunny #Hampshire
 
What I did yesterday morning. Watch a steam train going past.
Steam Train passing Aldermaston Station | Ministry of Propaganda
#pictures #england #steamtrain #steamlocomotive #Aldermaston
Steam Train passing Aldermaston Station
 
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Somebody Marked Thatcher’s Grave as a Public Restroom ! LMAO


I post pictures / meme every day about anarchy and other cool stuff.
Feel free to download them and share them ! :)

#shitposting #anarchist meme for cool people
#Thatcher #grave #piss #google #map #osm
#troll #humor #revenge #Ireland #Irish #history
#irishfolklore #irish #england #britain #ireland
 
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Somebody Marked Thatcher’s Grave as a Public Restroom ! LMAO


I post pictures / meme every day about anarchy and other cool stuff.
Feel free to download them and share them ! :)

#shitposting #anarchist meme for cool people
#Thatcher #grave #piss #google #map #osm
#troll #humor #revenge #Ireland #Irish #history
#irishfolklore #irish #england #britain #ireland
 
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40 Jahre nach Margaret Thatchers Amtsantritt ist Großbritannien gebrochen. Ein Fußmarsch durch ein verwüstetes Land
#Brexit #England #Neoliberalismus
https://www.freitag.de/autoren/the-guardian/die-wurzeln-der-wut
 
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40 Jahre nach Margaret Thatchers Amtsantritt ist Großbritannien gebrochen. Ein Fußmarsch durch ein verwüstetes Land
#Brexit #England #Neoliberalismus
https://www.freitag.de/autoren/the-guardian/die-wurzeln-der-wut
 

House of Commons speaker John Bercow refuses third vote on Brexit Deal


(I guess that he is sick of all the dis-orda in the House, which is the reason why he had to cut it all out. Frankly, I am thankful for this decision - they were in no way ready to ever find a meaningful and final decision if they weren't told to stop. The constructive face in this mess had long ended, it was a dying carcass that didn't want to accept its demise.)
Downing Street was blindsided by the announcement and unable to give a response at its regular afternoon briefing for journalists. “The speaker did not forewarn us of the content of his statement or the fact that he was making one,” May’s spokeswoman said.

“The Leader of the House is playing with her electronic device, and so is the deputy chief whip. I didn’t include him in the category of very senior people in the House but that’s a debatable proposition I readily grant.”
#Uk #UnitedKingdom #Brexit #Britain #GreatBritain #England #HardBrexit #NoDealBrexit #Bercow #JohnBercow #News #Politics #EU #Europe #Europa #EuropeanUnion #TheresaMay #Tory #Tories
 
What I did yesterday (well, some of what I did yesterday):
Ducks and other birds at Titchfield Haven Nature Reserve | Ministry of Propaganda
#birdwatching #birds #wildlife #pictures #photography #Hampshire #England
Ducks and other birds at Titchfield Haven Nature Reserve
 
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