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Items tagged with: ESA

Kerbal's 'Shared Horizons’ launched with real ESA missions








ESA and Kerbal Space Program enthusiasts now have ‘Shared Horizons’, a free update today to the space simulator to that allows gamers to build Ariane 5 rockets and tackle real ESA missions.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Kerbal's 'Shared Horizons’ launched with real ESA missions








ESA and Kerbal Space Program enthusiasts now have ‘Shared Horizons’, a free update today to the space simulator to that allows gamers to build Ariane 5 rockets and tackle real ESA missions.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Bike routing app uses space for cyclists








A navigation app that guides people on safer, more enjoyable bike journeys will be launched later this summer as social-distancing measures encourage more cyclists to take to the road.

Developed by London-based company Beeline, it uses space data and crowdsourced information to generate route suggestions, and can be connected to a device fixed onto the bike’s handlebars that provides easy-to-understand prompts.

#telecommunications #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Bike routing app uses space for cyclists








A navigation app that guides people on safer, more enjoyable bike journeys will be launched later this summer as social-distancing measures encourage more cyclists to take to the road.

Developed by London-based company Beeline, it uses space data and crowdsourced information to generate route suggestions, and can be connected to a device fixed onto the bike’s handlebars that provides easy-to-understand prompts.

#telecommunications #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Martian rover motors ahead








European engineers, together with Canada, are working on the technologies needed to find and retrieve samples from Mars, as part of ESA’s plans to send material from the Red Planet to Earth.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Martian rover motors ahead








European engineers, together with Canada, are working on the technologies needed to find and retrieve samples from Mars, as part of ESA’s plans to send material from the Red Planet to Earth.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Parking in a pandemic








The coronavirus pandemic has brought the tourism and travel industry to a near-standstill, with nationwide lockdowns significantly impacting the aviation and maritime industry worldwide. Satellite images, captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, show parked aircraft and anchored vessels in times of COVID-19.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Parking in a pandemic








The coronavirus pandemic has brought the tourism and travel industry to a near-standstill, with nationwide lockdowns significantly impacting the aviation and maritime industry worldwide. Satellite images, captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, show parked aircraft and anchored vessels in times of COVID-19.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Colourful Queensland, Australia


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto Image: This image, captured by Copernicus Sentinel-2, takes us over part of Channel Country – a pastural region located mostly in southwest Queensland, Australia.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Colourful Queensland, Australia


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto Image: This image, captured by Copernicus Sentinel-2, takes us over part of Channel Country – a pastural region located mostly in southwest Queensland, Australia.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Arctic Circle oil spill






Image: Images captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission show the extent of the Arctic Circle oil spill

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Arctic Circle oil spill






Image: Images captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission show the extent of the Arctic Circle oil spill

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Earth from Space: San Francisco Bay






Video: 00:00:00

In this week's edition of the Earth from Space programme, the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over San Francisco Bay in the US state of California.

See also San Francisco Bay to download the image.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Aeolus goes public








Delivering new information about Earth’s winds, ESA’s Aeolus mission has already been hailed a success. Today, this remarkable satellite mission has yet again achieved new heights: its data are now being distributed publicly to forecasting services and scientific users in less than three hours of measurements being made from space.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Aeolus goes public








Delivering new information about Earth’s winds, ESA’s Aeolus mission has already been hailed a success. Today, this remarkable satellite mission has yet again achieved new heights: its data are now being distributed publicly to forecasting services and scientific users in less than three hours of measurements being made from space.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Astronaut urine for building a Moon base








From human waste to superplasticiser, astronaut urine could become a useful resource for making a robust type of concrete on the Moon.

#human #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Astronaut urine for building a Moon base








From human waste to superplasticiser, astronaut urine could become a useful resource for making a robust type of concrete on the Moon.

#human #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 
The ultimate 4-wheel-drive: How ESA's keeping XMM-Newton alive after 20 years and beyond • The Register

Wow this really awesome engineering and designing stuff that can be used longer than expected. And this all due to some very clever people

#esa #space #science #astronomy
 

Dutch tulip fields come into bloom






Image: Captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, these beautiful views from space show the Dutch tulip fields coming into bloom.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Dutch tulip fields come into bloom






Image: Captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, these beautiful views from space show the Dutch tulip fields coming into bloom.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Deserted Venetian lagoon


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto Image: The Venetian lagoon appears almost deserted following Italy's lockdown to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease - as seen by Copernicus Sentinel-2

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Deserted Venetian lagoon


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto Image: The Venetian lagoon appears almost deserted following Italy's lockdown to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease - as seen by Copernicus Sentinel-2

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Wheatbelt, Western Australia


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto Image: This Copernicus Sentinel-2 image features an area in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Wheatbelt, Western Australia


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto Image: This Copernicus Sentinel-2 image features an area in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Cheops opens its eye to the sky








Six weeks after the launch of Cheops, ESA’s Characterising Exoplanet Satellite, the telescope cover was opened as part of the mission’s in-orbit commissioning.

#space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Cheops opens its eye to the sky








Six weeks after the launch of Cheops, ESA’s Characterising Exoplanet Satellite, the telescope cover was opened as part of the mission’s in-orbit commissioning.

#space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Huygens landing spin mystery solved








Fifteen years ago today, ESA’s Huygens probe made history when it descended to the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan and became the first probe to successfully land on another world in the outer Solar System. However, during its descent, the probe began spinning the wrong way – and recent tests now reveal why.

#space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Huygens landing spin mystery solved








Fifteen years ago today, ESA’s Huygens probe made history when it descended to the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan and became the first probe to successfully land on another world in the outer Solar System. However, during its descent, the probe began spinning the wrong way – and recent tests now reveal why.

#space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Earth from Space: Tromsø






Video: 00:02:34

This week's edition of the Earth from Space programme features a Copernicus Sentinel-2 image over Tromsø – the largest city in northern Norway.
See also Tromsø, Norway to download the image.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Earth from Space: Tromsø






Video: 00:02:34

This week's edition of the Earth from Space programme features a Copernicus Sentinel-2 image over Tromsø – the largest city in northern Norway.
See also Tromsø, Norway to download the image.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

The sprite before Christmas






Image:

Someone decked the skies with boughs of sprites.

The red jellyfish in the sky is a unique red sprite high above a storm across the southern plains of the United States.

Taken in the early hours of 21 October by outdoor photographer Paul Smith, red sprites, along with blue jets and elves, are elusive electrical discharges in the upper atmosphere that are difficult to study as they occur over thunderstorms and propagate out into space.

“There were some very strong events and many dancing sprites as the storms matured,” says Paul.

“I was so amazed to capture some very bright reflections in the lake I was shooting from. I was out until the early hours of the morning and got home at 5:00, but so worth it!” The photo was taken from Lake Acadia, Oklahoma. Watch a video of the storm .

Sightings of these elusive high altitude optical phenomena had long been based on hearsay and appeared to be linked with thunderstorms. First camera images of red sprites were obtained about 30 years ago. The scientific community was intrigued and wanted to learn more, leading to the creation of an observatory that is now aboard the International Space Station.

Called the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor, or ASIM, the suite of instruments includes optical cameras and photometers to capture red sprites and other high altitude luminous events as well as lightning. ASIM also carries a Gamma-ray detector to study so-called Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs).

All these instruments are mounted together outside the European Columbus module and look downwards towards the Earth. The combination of optical and Gamma-ray detectors in the same payload makes it possible to describe the lightning processes that lead to TGF emissions. ASIM provides the highest ever spatial and temporal resolution for the study of electrical activity linked to thunderstorms.

New data from ASIM will improve our understanding of the effect of thunderstorms on the atmosphere and thus contribute to more accurate climate models.

The data ASIM is generating has been made available to the public for the first time and can be consulted at the ASIM Science Data Center. A recent paper was also published in Science magazine.

Though they are difficult to detect due to their faintness and the fact that they disappear within milliseconds, the conditions from Earth were just right to catch these sprites in action.

You can find more of Paul’s work on his website, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

The sprite before Christmas






Image:

Someone decked the skies with boughs of sprites.

The red jellyfish in the sky is a unique red sprite high above a storm across the southern plains of the United States.

Taken in the early hours of 21 October by outdoor photographer Paul Smith, red sprites, along with blue jets and elves, are elusive electrical discharges in the upper atmosphere that are difficult to study as they occur over thunderstorms and propagate out into space.

“There were some very strong events and many dancing sprites as the storms matured,” says Paul.

“I was so amazed to capture some very bright reflections in the lake I was shooting from. I was out until the early hours of the morning and got home at 5:00, but so worth it!” The photo was taken from Lake Acadia, Oklahoma. Watch a video of the storm .

Sightings of these elusive high altitude optical phenomena had long been based on hearsay and appeared to be linked with thunderstorms. First camera images of red sprites were obtained about 30 years ago. The scientific community was intrigued and wanted to learn more, leading to the creation of an observatory that is now aboard the International Space Station.

Called the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor, or ASIM, the suite of instruments includes optical cameras and photometers to capture red sprites and other high altitude luminous events as well as lightning. ASIM also carries a Gamma-ray detector to study so-called Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs).

All these instruments are mounted together outside the European Columbus module and look downwards towards the Earth. The combination of optical and Gamma-ray detectors in the same payload makes it possible to describe the lightning processes that lead to TGF emissions. ASIM provides the highest ever spatial and temporal resolution for the study of electrical activity linked to thunderstorms.

New data from ASIM will improve our understanding of the effect of thunderstorms on the atmosphere and thus contribute to more accurate climate models.

The data ASIM is generating has been made available to the public for the first time and can be consulted at the ASIM Science Data Center. A recent paper was also published in Science magazine.

Though they are difficult to detect due to their faintness and the fact that they disappear within milliseconds, the conditions from Earth were just right to catch these sprites in action.

You can find more of Paul’s work on his website, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

The sprite before Christmas






Image:

Someone decked the skies with boughs of sprites.

The red jellyfish in the sky is a unique red sprite high above a storm across the southern plains of the United States.

Taken in the early hours of 21 October by outdoor photographer Paul Smith, red sprites, along with blue jets and elves, are elusive electrical discharges in the upper atmosphere that are difficult to study as they occur over thunderstorms and propagate out into space.

“There were some very strong events and many dancing sprites as the storms matured,” says Paul.

“I was so amazed to capture some very bright reflections in the lake I was shooting from. I was out until the early hours of the morning and got home at 5:00, but so worth it!” The photo was taken from Lake Acadia, Oklahoma. Watch a video of the storm .

Sightings of these elusive high altitude optical phenomena had long been based on hearsay and appeared to be linked with thunderstorms. First camera images of red sprites were obtained about 30 years ago. The scientific community was intrigued and wanted to learn more, leading to the creation of an observatory that is now aboard the International Space Station.

Called the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor, or ASIM, the suite of instruments includes optical cameras and photometers to capture red sprites and other high altitude luminous events as well as lightning. ASIM also carries a Gamma-ray detector to study so-called Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs).

All these instruments are mounted together outside the European Columbus module and look downwards towards the Earth. The combination of optical and Gamma-ray detectors in the same payload makes it possible to describe the lightning processes that lead to TGF emissions. ASIM provides the highest ever spatial and temporal resolution for the study of electrical activity linked to thunderstorms.

New data from ASIM will improve our understanding of the effect of thunderstorms on the atmosphere and thus contribute to more accurate climate models.

The data ASIM is generating has been made available to the public for the first time and can be consulted at the ASIM Science Data Center. A recent paper was also published in Science magazine.

Though they are difficult to detect due to their faintness and the fact that they disappear within milliseconds, the conditions from Earth were just right to catch these sprites in action.

You can find more of Paul’s work on his website, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Spain joins Copernicus Sentinel Collaborative Ground Segment


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto

Today, ESA and Spain’s Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology signed an understanding that will boost Spain’s access to Copernicus Sentinel data.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

Spain joins Copernicus Sentinel Collaborative Ground Segment


Bild/Foto

Bild/Foto

Today, ESA and Spain’s Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology signed an understanding that will boost Spain’s access to Copernicus Sentinel data.

#earth #science #space #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

A very good start






Image:

The first spacewalk to service the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) could not have gone better. Lead spacewalker ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano is imaged here hitching a ride on the International Space Station’s 16-metre long robotic arm to kick off the first of four ventures to service the particle physics detector on 15 November.

While all spacewalks are a carefully planned and detailed affair, the four spacewalks for AMS are exceptionally difficult as the bus-sized dark matter detector was never designed to be maintained in space. But after three successful years of delivering ground breaking science, the decision was made to extend its lifetime.

The cooling pumps for AMS-02 need maintenance and without them it will no longer be able to collect data on the cosmic rays that are bombarding our planet. The first question spacewalk designers had to answer whether this was even possible.

The first spacewalk proved it was not only possible, but thanks to the planning and trained that began as early as 2017, Luca and his spacewalking partner Andrew Morgan could achieve more than scheduled – setting them in good stead for the next phase.

The spacewalk began, as they all do, with “prebreathing” for up to two hours. Similar to scuba divers, astronauts can suffer from the ‘bends’: quickly changing pressure can turn the nitrogen in human bodies into bubbles with serious symptoms. To avoid this, astronauts breathe pure oxygen to purge their bodies of nitrogen.

Luca and NASA astronaut Drew Morgan left the depressurised Quest airlock at 13:10 CET (12:10 GMT), with Luca grabbing the ride to AMS on the robotic arm controlled by NASA astronaut Jessica Meir while Drew ferried handrails and equipment by hand to the worksite.

The main task of this spacewalk was to remove the debris shield covering AMS, with an estimated three hours portioned for this task. Luca and Drew managed to jettison the debris shield to burn up safely in Earth’s atmosphere well ahead of schedule.

Luca and Drew also installed three handrails in the vicinity of AMS to prepare for the next spacewalks and removed zip ties on the AMS’ vertical support strut.

Amazingly, the duo were still well ahead of the six hours planned for the main task of removing the debris shield.

When time permits, mission control give spacewalkers some “get ahead” tasks. Although there were no get-ahead tasks planned for this spacewalk the duo was so far ahead of schedule that mission control agreed they continue work originally planned for the second AMS spacewalk. Luca removed the screws from a carbon-fibre cover under the insulation and passed the cover to Drew to jettison once again.

The pair cleaned up, took some photos of their killer views, gathered tools, and made their way back to the airlock, clocking in 6 hours and 39 minutes for this promising start to AMS maintenance.

The next spacewalk is scheduled for 22 November. Watch the spacewalk via ESA Web TV.

Got questions about AMS? Post them using the hashtag #SpacewalkForAMS on Twitter and follow the hashtag for the latest.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 

A very good start






Image:

The first spacewalk to service the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) could not have gone better. Lead spacewalker ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano is imaged here hitching a ride on the International Space Station’s 16-metre long robotic arm to kick off the first of four ventures to service the particle physics detector on 15 November.

While all spacewalks are a carefully planned and detailed affair, the four spacewalks for AMS are exceptionally difficult as the bus-sized dark matter detector was never designed to be maintained in space. But after three successful years of delivering ground breaking science, the decision was made to extend its lifetime.

The cooling pumps for AMS-02 need maintenance and without them it will no longer be able to collect data on the cosmic rays that are bombarding our planet. The first question spacewalk designers had to answer whether this was even possible.

The first spacewalk proved it was not only possible, but thanks to the planning and trained that began as early as 2017, Luca and his spacewalking partner Andrew Morgan could achieve more than scheduled – setting them in good stead for the next phase.

The spacewalk began, as they all do, with “prebreathing” for up to two hours. Similar to scuba divers, astronauts can suffer from the ‘bends’: quickly changing pressure can turn the nitrogen in human bodies into bubbles with serious symptoms. To avoid this, astronauts breathe pure oxygen to purge their bodies of nitrogen.

Luca and NASA astronaut Drew Morgan left the depressurised Quest airlock at 13:10 CET (12:10 GMT), with Luca grabbing the ride to AMS on the robotic arm controlled by NASA astronaut Jessica Meir while Drew ferried handrails and equipment by hand to the worksite.

The main task of this spacewalk was to remove the debris shield covering AMS, with an estimated three hours portioned for this task. Luca and Drew managed to jettison the debris shield to burn up safely in Earth’s atmosphere well ahead of schedule.

Luca and Drew also installed three handrails in the vicinity of AMS to prepare for the next spacewalks and removed zip ties on the AMS’ vertical support strut.

Amazingly, the duo were still well ahead of the six hours planned for the main task of removing the debris shield.

When time permits, mission control give spacewalkers some “get ahead” tasks. Although there were no get-ahead tasks planned for this spacewalk the duo was so far ahead of schedule that mission control agreed they continue work originally planned for the second AMS spacewalk. Luca removed the screws from a carbon-fibre cover under the insulation and passed the cover to Drew to jettison once again.

The pair cleaned up, took some photos of their killer views, gathered tools, and made their way back to the airlock, clocking in 6 hours and 39 minutes for this promising start to AMS maintenance.

The next spacewalk is scheduled for 22 November. Watch the spacewalk via ESA Web TV.

Got questions about AMS? Post them using the hashtag #SpacewalkForAMS on Twitter and follow the hashtag for the latest.

#news #space #science #esa #europeanspaceagency
posted by pod_feeder_v2
 
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