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Does anyone have any experience getting an XM1541 (or XE1541) to work? I have the following model:

XEM1541 V6



I got it years ago, but didn't have the time to try and get it to work. Looking things up now, it seems that the instructions for Linux are very complicated, and only work up to kernel 3.x (I do not know any currently available Linux distribution which uses such an old kernel). And the only versions of Windows supported are from Windows NT to Windows 8. All of my old Windows XP computers have died, however, and really the only old Windows computer I have left which is functional has Windows Millenium on it.

I'm okay with booting up my old Windows Me computer to a command prompt and running a DOS program to use this device. I have two Commodore 1541 floppy drives, and I think both are functional. So I could have one hooked up to my WinMe computer, and one hooked up to my Commodore 128.

What I'd really like, though, is if someone out there has an older linux install with OpenCBM working on it - or a liveCD with OpenCBM on it. Then I could just copy the whole OS and run it on any of my old computers. (Unlike Windows, Linux is not picky about being copied/moved into another computer.)

Thanks for any help!

#OpenCBM #Commodore #Commodore64 #C64
 
Does anyone have any experience getting an XM1541 (or XE1541) to work? I have the following model:

XEM1541 V6



I got it years ago, but didn't have the time to try and get it to work. Looking things up now, it seems that the instructions for Linux are very complicated, and only work up to kernel 3.x (I do not know any currently available Linux distribution which uses such an old kernel). And the only versions of Windows supported are from Windows NT to Windows 8. All of my old Windows XP computers have died, however, and really the only old Windows computer I have left which is functional has Windows Millenium on it.

I'm okay with booting up my old Windows Me computer to a command prompt and running a DOS program to use this device. I have two Commodore 1541 floppy drives, and I think both are functional. So I could have one hooked up to my WinMe computer, and one hooked up to my Commodore 128.

What I'd really like, though, is if someone out there has an older linux install with OpenCBM working on it - or a liveCD with OpenCBM on it. Then I could just copy the whole OS and run it on any of my old computers. (Unlike Windows, Linux is not picky about being copied/moved into another computer.)

Thanks for any help!

#OpenCBM #Commodore #Commodore64 #C64
 
Nice article on the C64 SID chip. I have fond memories of it. :-)
As recounted in IEEE Spectrum’s March 1985 design case history [PDF]of the C64 by Tekla S. Perry and Paul Wallich, MOS originally intended just to make a new graphics chip and a new sound chip. The idea was to sell them as components to microcomputer manufacturers. But those chips turned out to be so good that MOS decided to make its own computer.

Creation of the sound chip fell to a young engineer called Robert Yannes. He was the perfect choice for the job, motivated by a long-standing interest in electronic sound. Although there were some advanced microcomputer-controlled synthesizers available, including the Super Sound board designed for use with the Cosmac VIP system, the built-in sound generation tech in home computers was relatively crude. Yannes had higher ambitions. “I’d worked with synthesizers, and I wanted a chip that was a music synthesizer,” Yannes told Spectrum in 1985. His big advantage was that MOS had a manufacturing fab on-site. This allowed for cheap and fast experimentation and testing: “The actual design only took about four or five months,” said Yannes.
#RetroComputing #ComputerHistory #Computers #Commodore64 #Music #MusicSynthesis
 
Nice article on the C64 SID chip. I have fond memories of it. :-)
As recounted in IEEE Spectrum’s March 1985 design case history [PDF]of the C64 by Tekla S. Perry and Paul Wallich, MOS originally intended just to make a new graphics chip and a new sound chip. The idea was to sell them as components to microcomputer manufacturers. But those chips turned out to be so good that MOS decided to make its own computer.

Creation of the sound chip fell to a young engineer called Robert Yannes. He was the perfect choice for the job, motivated by a long-standing interest in electronic sound. Although there were some advanced microcomputer-controlled synthesizers available, including the Super Sound board designed for use with the Cosmac VIP system, the built-in sound generation tech in home computers was relatively crude. Yannes had higher ambitions. “I’d worked with synthesizers, and I wanted a chip that was a music synthesizer,” Yannes told Spectrum in 1985. His big advantage was that MOS had a manufacturing fab on-site. This allowed for cheap and fast experimentation and testing: “The actual design only took about four or five months,” said Yannes.
#RetroComputing #ComputerHistory #Computers #Commodore64 #Music #MusicSynthesis
 
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